- By Elizabeth Hallam

Capetian France 987-1328

  • Title: Capetian France 987-1328
  • Author: Elizabeth Hallam
  • ISBN: 9780582404281
  • Page: 237
  • Format: Paperback
  • Capetian France In when Hugh Capet took the throne of France founding a dynasty which was to rule for over years his kingdom was weak and insignificant But by the kingdom of France was beginning to d

    In 987, when Hugh Capet took the throne of France, founding a dynasty which was to rule for over 300 years, his kingdom was weak and insignificant But by 1100, the kingdom of France was beginning to dominate the cultural nd religious life of western Europe In the centuries that followed, to scholars and to poets, to reforming churchmen and monks, to crusaders and the desIn 987, when Hugh Capet took the throne of France, founding a dynasty which was to rule for over 300 years, his kingdom was weak and insignificant But by 1100, the kingdom of France was beginning to dominate the cultural nd religious life of western Europe In the centuries that followed, to scholars and to poets, to reforming churchmen and monks, to crusaders and the designers of churches, France was the hub of the universe La douce France drew people like a magnet even though its kings were, until about 1200, comparatively insignificant figures Then, thanks to the conquests and reforms of King Philip Augustus, France became a dominant force in political and economic terms as well, producing a saint king, Louis IX, and in Philip IV, a ruler so powerful that he could dictate to popes and emperors Spanning France s development across four centuries, Capetian France is a definitive book This second edition has been carefully revised to take account of the very latest work, without losing the original book s popular balance between a compelling narrative and an fascinating examination of the period s main themes.

    1 thought on “Capetian France 987-1328

    1. The Capetian Kings of France or The Capetian Monarchy would be a more apt title for Elizabeth Hallam's overview of French political history from Hugh Capet's assumption of the kingship from the Carolingians in 987 to the end of the main Capetian line with the death of Charles IV in 1328. Above all, her work functions as a narrative of how Capetian power grew over 300+ years: after starting as a rather typical territorial prince armed with theoretical claims to the powers of kingship more than ac [...]

    2. Not, it's not exactly a captivating page-turner, but it is a very informative academic account of its subject matter. Under the Capetians, France congealed as a kingdom, but we shouldn't read that as inevitable. There were ups and downs along the way and it was never foreordained that things would work out as they did. The early Capetian kings had minimal power outside their own family domains around Paris. Barons and lords could ignore the kings with impunity, especially in southern France. Thi [...]

    3. I found the story of how the dynasty's power grew interesting but the book was a bit dry otherwise. Books about the periods before modern nations were founded can be confusing since there were often so many contending groups and rulers. I also was reading three books which is almost always a mistake. :-)

    4. Finally, someone to explicate the placement of la Vicomté de Limoges in the feudal pyramid that was la Duché d'Aquitaine. Those dukes were tit-squeezing motherfuckers!

    5. This is not popular history, but as someone who is interested in the subject, I enjoyed this as a companion to my Medieval France lectures at school. That being said, I also have a professor who brings these accounts to life and makes them a bit more 'thrilling,' if you will. This book offers a solid account of the Capetian dynasty, but as another reviewer mentioned, there seems to be difficulty weaving together other aspects of society and culture at this time. I noticed that I would be intrigu [...]

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