- By Kathleen Tyau

Makai

  • Title: Makai
  • Author: Kathleen Tyau
  • ISBN: 9780807083451
  • Page: 188
  • Format: Paperback
  • Makai A Chinese Hawaiian woman explores racial tension and cultural norms through passionate friendship and family tragedy Tyau writes graceful and nuanced prose and she proves to be a perceptive observer

    A Chinese Hawaiian woman explores racial tension and cultural norms through passionate friendship and family tragedy Tyau writes graceful and nuanced prose, and she proves to be a perceptive observer of her character s shifting emotions This novel does indeed resound sweetly Julie Gray, The New York Times Book Review

    1 thought on “Makai

    1. I got this book for Christmas (maybe it was 2003, maybe it was my birthday, but anyway) and also The Strokes Is This It. In my mind the two are irrevocably linked. But besides that, this book is amazing- the main character is ordinary, but the tragedies of her life are given weight, so that it feels more like an epic than anything else.

    2. An interesting novel in format and content; covers the highs and lows of the life of a middle aged minority women. Elements of nostalgia, war horrors, multiple relationship snafus of all variations are present. Tyau does a nice job weaving topics like generation gaps and cultural differences subtly throughout the story. This received 4 stars from me because of the lead up to the ambiguous ending that felt a little underwhelming for me.Overall, this was an enlightening read and I enjoyed it.

    3. A story about Hawaii set in the not so long ago past. I am very familiar with Hawaii so I can vouch for the authenticity of the descriptions. The author, Tyau, does a great job setting up the story of Alice Lum, the Chinese-Hawaiian woman, whose friendship with a bold and beautiful woman is full of drama and tragedy. Someone should make this book into a film. It has the ingredients for an intriguing movie. The style of writing is a bit stream of consciousness so it takes some getting used to, bu [...]

    4. I loved knowing all the places the characters inhabited in this book. It takes place on both Maui and Oahu, the only two islands I have visited, both with fond memories. I also liked the story of two girlfriends who had ups and downs in their friendship, but always a deep connection. The male characters were varied and sometimes mysterious, which made them more interesting. The storyline moved erratically across time, but was very clear. I would definitely read more by this author.

    5. I just randomly picked up this book because of the title (makai means to go towards the water if you are giving someone directions in Hawaiian). It was non-linear and the descriptions of Maui and Oahu were very vivid and beautiful, I can totally picture all of the places the book mentions that I have been to. The protagonist depressed me though, and it actually made me sad the whole time I read it!

    6. I had to read this book carefully. It's exceptionally well-written as the author wanders from the past, to the present, her dreams and life. She shares history from the 1940's and forward, while living in Hawaii. Her writing captures the voices of the various cultures of the Islands. Mahalo

    7. Since I lived in Hawaii several years ago I find myself searching out books about Hawaii, Hawaiian culture and people. This book was full of interesting characters but I didn't like the almost stream of consciousness writing style.

    8. I needed a reading excursion to Hawaii, and as usual, I was reminded that the stories of the islands are much more interesting than the myths of paradise.

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