- By Ray Robertson

Why Not?: Fifteen Reasons to Live

  • Title: Why Not?: Fifteen Reasons to Live
  • Author: Ray Robertson
  • ISBN: 9781926845272
  • Page: 464
  • Format: Paperback
  • Why Not Fifteen Reasons to Live Shortly after completing his sixth novel Ray Robertson suffered a depression of suicidal intensity Soon after his recover he decided to try and answer two of the biggest questions we can ask What ma

    Shortly after completing his sixth novel, Ray Robertson suffered a depression of suicidal intensity Soon after his recover, he decided to try and answer two of the biggest questions we can ask What makes humans happy And what makes a life worth living His answers aren t what you might expect from a mental illness memoir but they re exactly what you d expect from Ray RobShortly after completing his sixth novel, Ray Robertson suffered a depression of suicidal intensity Soon after his recover, he decided to try and answer two of the biggest questions we can ask What makes humans happy And what makes a life worth living His answers aren t what you might expect from a mental illness memoir but they re exactly what you d expect from Ray Robertson With the vitality of Nick Hornby and a brashness all his own, Robertson runs his hands over life, death, intoxication, and art Unashamedly working class and unabashedly literary, Why Not is a rolling, rocking, anti Sisyphean odyssey.

    1 thought on “Why Not?: Fifteen Reasons to Live

    1. Okay, this is not yet a review. I've only read one of the essays since I bought the book last night but I did want to write down a few words to remind myself of the evening during which I bought the book.I really enjoy the way this author writes. My favourite of his books is Gently Down the Stream. When I told him so at the signing session after his reading from Why Not?, he said his publisher would be happy to hear that. From that I surmised that it was not his own favourite. Maybe I should hav [...]

    2. Roberston wrote these essays to help him shake off a bout of depression that hit after he finished a novel. As you may guess, there are fifteen of them, on diverse topics -- art, friendship, humour and so on. He's a great writer, very insightful and knowledgeable -- my God, is he knowledgeable. How many writers cite sources as diverse as Simon Weil and Dion and the Belmonts -- in the same essay? I didn't know him at all before, but I am going to move on to his novels now.

    3. It seems rather cruel not be anything but wildly enthusiastic about a book that consists of the author's reasons for living but this book was mildly disappointing. The "fifteen reasons" Robertson gives are really only about five reasons that get re-told in only slightly different ways. Perhaps I had unrealistic expectations of finding a reason or two that I could add to my own "why not?" list. That said I did enjoy the book well enough and I learned quite a bit about Nietzche.Robertson has troub [...]

    4. This isn't some sappy, self-help book filled with banal platitudes and new age mantras. Considering that author Ray Robertson suffers from near crippling OCD and barely weathered a near suicidal depression he's not one to espouse ideas like "to thine own self be true". Then again fellow writer (and, perhaps in tasteless understatement, one who didn't fare as well against his depression) David Foster Wallace would go on to say that "in the day -to-day trenches of adult existence, banal platitudes [...]

    5. I think I may have missed the point of this book entirely. I guess I took the title literally and thought that maybe this would be a realistic and empathetic gem of a book, the bright light to talk me out of my depressive state by someone who has been there.It's not.Mostly, it read like a 100-level philosophy course book report. Or a collection of Nietzsche and Seneca quotations?Either way, nothing really new or revolutionary here. Just some guy regurgitating poets, and scholars, and philosopher [...]

    6. Some things I really loved about this collection, some things I didn't. The collection is a book of 15 essays, all about things that make life worth living for Robertson, who suffers from OCD and OCD induced depression as a result. I understand a lot of the things that he enjoys, but there were some things that he loves that do nothing for me. This is largely a philosophical book and Robertson draws on the works of many writers. I enjoyed a lot of the references, but found some parts of this boo [...]

    7. Ray Robertson is a friend, and I like spending time with him. Reading this book is like spending time with him in all his smart, well-read, cranky wisdom. But if you haven't read any of his books, I'd recommend his novels first -- Moody Food, What Happened Later, and Heroes are all terrific, and I'll be getting to David shortly too. That's where he's at his best as a writer.

    8. truly impressive I saw this author at a panel last fall and he read from this book. His wit and satire is quite wonderful and his sideburns are to die for. As for the story it truly is a must read for everyone. Its a bit think in the quotes because he got his undergrad in philosophy and it shows. using Nietzsche and Seneca quotes all over the book.

    9. Amazing. I will definitely make a note to read this book once a year. It is a straight, no nonsense philosophical book from a Canadian author. Awesome. Could not stop reading what the author had to say next!

    10. Parts of it were great and made me consider re-reading it at some later point, which I almost never do. Other parts struck me as cynical or a bit boring.

    11. thoreau claimed that," i would rather sit on a pumpkin, and have it all to myself, than to be crowded on a velvet cushion."

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