- By Nicholas Fisk

Trillions

  • Title: Trillions
  • Author: Nicholas Fisk
  • ISBN: 9780241020463
  • Page: 288
  • Format: None
  • Trillions Trillions were hard bright tiny things which suddenly arrived millions and millions and millions fo them one windy day in a village called Harbourtown No one could explain them much less why they

    Trillions were hard, bright, tiny things which suddenly arrived, millions and millions and millions fo them, one windy day in a village called Harbourtown.No one could explain them, much less why they had suddenly arrived Were they a blessing, as their beauty suggested, or a deadly, inexplicable threat A boy with a microscope was just as likely to come up with the answerTrillions were hard, bright, tiny things which suddenly arrived, millions and millions and millions fo them, one windy day in a village called Harbourtown.No one could explain them, much less why they had suddenly arrived Were they a blessing, as their beauty suggested, or a deadly, inexplicable threat A boy with a microscope was just as likely to come up with the answer as all the acknowledged experts in any known kind of science, so somehow it seemed natural for two ordinary boys, Scott and Bem, to join forces with an ex spaceman against the frightening efforts of the ruthless General Harman to destroy the Trillions, no matter what the cost.This tense and highly original book is by the author of six other exciting favourites, Space Hostages , Grinny , Time Trap , A rag, a bone and a Hank of Hair and Wheelie in the Stars.

    1 thought on “Trillions

    1. What a beguiling and sophisticated book this is. I read Nicholas Fisk voraciously as a child and when I saw this in a charity shop (with the evocative 1980s reprint cover, not the unappealing and frankly misleading new one) I snapped it up.I do remember finding it a bit obtuse when I was younger and no wonder - the substance of the book is all themes and ideas, with characters and story sketched out with a minimum of fuss. That is, on the whole, a strength, and actually the characters are no wea [...]

    2. I remember this book from my childhood, I may have been 9 or thereabouts and it was given to me at school if I recall correctly. My memories are very positive (I gave the book a 4* on the basis of them) but it turns out that I never actually read past the first 3 chapters.The first three chapters are pretty good because the idea at the heart of this book - tiny crystals raining down from space and demonstrating the ability to move together and mimic things - is pretty damn cool. Basically this i [...]

    3. Bad writing, bad science (even for 1971), poor characterizations, and a tedious, nonsensical plot. I had a longer review but it didn't post, but that covers it all. I was disappointed because I've read other books by Fisk and enjoyed them. This is not one of his winners.

    4. I am in the middle of this books so I will review when finished. So fProgress report: It has not improved. I will probably finish, as it is a short book. One problem about reviewing children's books is I am an adult. The idea is fairly good for this book--strange crystal creature appear everywhere on earth, the characters are only average. But, no doubt, when I was 10 I woul have loved it.This was written in 1971; does show how much sf for children has improved nowadays.Finished. I am reluctantl [...]

    5. I read this as a first edition, which I still have somewhere. A cracking read for any child, it's the story of what happens when humans encounter an alien species or life-form that we don't understand.Sometimes it takes a child's-eye view to make sense* of things. Children trust and explore, where adults want to destroy. I have very fond memories of this novel, and I'm sure it influenced me. It's a timeless story, and I think any child would enjoy it. I wonder if ET owes something to it in terms [...]

    6. I first read this when I was 10 years old. It was one of the first books I borrowed from my high school library, and the first time I was aware of reading a science fiction story. I liked it enough then to go on to read more of Fisk's books, and to devour the SF sections of the school and public libraries. I came across it yesterday in a charity shop, and at 50c I couldn't refuse! Let's see if I enjoy it as much now as I did then.***Hmm. Best left as a fond memory, I think.

    7. My dad used to take me to the Library almost every weekend. I remember one weekend at the downtown Los Angeles library. I stopped running around the facility and made my way to the children's book section.This is the book I picked up. I remember reading it non stop and still remember it fondly.We have millions, We have billions, We have Trillions!

    8. I read this when I was about 10 and it made such an impression on me. Reading it 40 years on was interesting as when it was written the nuclear age was upon us and nuclear weapons were considered for use. We now know the damage they do so it seems a naive story in retrospect. Glad to read it again though, interesting.

    9. Love everything about this book - I hesitate to say the concept's unique, because nothing is, but it's like nothing else I've ever read and I love it for that. Once again Fisk's children are 100% real and flawed and just fab.

    10. Like so many others writing a review for this, I read this at school. Will it hold up to my memory of it being a great book? Or should I stop before I ruin another one (Narnia!)Hmmm, my memory was combining two books into one- now what was that other book?

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