- By Thos. Kent Miller

Allan Quatermain at the Crucible of Life

  • Title: Allan Quatermain at the Crucible of Life
  • Author: Thos. Kent Miller
  • ISBN: 9781434430670
  • Page: 439
  • Format: Paperback
  • Allan Quatermain at the Crucible of Life As Allan Quatermain s memoir of an east African quest unfolds readers are swallowed by a maelstrom of ideas and adventures relentlessly descending into a scholarly labyrinth of books within books ma

    As Allan Quatermain s memoir of an east African quest unfolds, readers are swallowed by a maelstrom of ideas and adventures relentlessly descending into a scholarly labyrinth of books within books, manuscripts within manuscripts, and tales with tales.Not since Umberto Eco s The Name of the Rose has the spirit of Sherlock Holmes been pressed into such exotic service From EtAs Allan Quatermain s memoir of an east African quest unfolds, readers are swallowed by a maelstrom of ideas and adventures relentlessly descending into a scholarly labyrinth of books within books, manuscripts within manuscripts, and tales with tales.Not since Umberto Eco s The Name of the Rose has the spirit of Sherlock Holmes been pressed into such exotic service From Ethiopia to Tibet, Sherlock Holmes encounters both the hideous and the divine and forever rips asunder the fragile veil that separates us from worlds unknown.With Holmes, Allan Quatermain leads a veritable host of the nineteenth century s luminaries including Gunnery Sergeants Daniel Dravot and Peachy Carnehan, explorer Sir Richard Burton, astronomer Maria Mitchell, and Police Detective Sergeant Cuff into the bitter heart of Hell Here you ll find danger, close calls, magnificent landscapes, wry humor, stern and practical questioning, two lost worlds, and Quatermain s stumbling upon no less than the very essence of the meaning of life which he then discounts as a wizard s trick

    1 thought on “Allan Quatermain at the Crucible of Life

    1. There have been several attempts (and there would be more) to bring the famous Victorian fictional characters together, often caused by or in the presence of actual historical personalities (the genres have been classified under different monickers, including "steampunk", and has been given a new lease of life by Alan Moore, with his [[ASIN:0613912942 The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Volume One]] and [[ASIN:B0064W641W The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (Vol. 2 )]]), but this particular [...]

    2. Very strange book if there ever was one. Thos Miller admits candidly at the prologue that, like many of us, he discovered "treasure hunt" stories through Uncle Scrooge comics, in which Donald Duck's uncle and his nephews lived great adventures.Only later did he discover Rider Haggard and his character Allan Quatermain, to whom movie adventurers like Indiana Jones owe so much.And it's Quatermain who is the narrator of this story, ┬┤when he finds himself in a mission in Africa-in fact, several- in [...]

    3. Really quite a good deal of fun. I blundered into this book on , following up on several recommendations, and was very pleased I did. Drawing together not only an array of characters from the period, but also an interesting assembly of writing styles and plot conventions, Miller achieved a book that was both quite in keeping with the genre and strikingly unique. I look forward to more.

    4. I do not want to go too much into the storyline for fear of giving away the ending, but there are additional novels involving Allan Allan Quatermain. The review will apply to basically all the novels in the Allan Quatermain series. The interesting part is that after finishing the novel Allan Quatermain you would think the story ends, but it does not. The novels are about three privileged Englishmen who, out of life's boredom, head over to Africa for a little adventure. When reading the books you [...]

    5. This is fan fiction, fairly superior fan fiction, but fan fiction all the same, to anyone not interested in H. Rider Haggard and/ or Conan Doyle it's of very limited interest. The main story Allan Quatermain at the crucible of life suffers from trying to shoehorn in too many plot strands and characters from fiction and fact neither of which are ever fully developed, the presence of a young Sherlock Holmes never takes on the significance hoped for. The framing devices are too long winded, if fair [...]

    6. The main story was a bit short overall with what I felt were very distracting side thoughts or flash backs that didn't really add much to the overall picture of the main story. I feel that this should of belonged in a collection of short stories rather than a stand alone novel.

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