- By Isaiah Helekunihi Walker

Waves of Resistance: Surfing and History in Twentieth-Century Hawaii

  • Title: Waves of Resistance: Surfing and History in Twentieth-Century Hawaii
  • Author: Isaiah Helekunihi Walker
  • ISBN: 9780824835477
  • Page: 151
  • Format: Paperback
  • Waves of Resistance Surfing and History in Twentieth Century Hawaii Surfing has been a significant sport and cultural practice in Hawai i for than years In the last century facing increased marginalization on land many Native Hawaiians have found refuge auton

    Surfing has been a significant sport and cultural practice in Hawai i for than 1,500 years In the last century, facing increased marginalization on land, many Native Hawaiians have found refuge, autonomy, and identity in the waves In Waves of Resistance Isaiah Walker argues that throughout the twentieth century Hawaiian surfers have successfully resisted colonial enSurfing has been a significant sport and cultural practice in Hawai i for than 1,500 years In the last century, facing increased marginalization on land, many Native Hawaiians have found refuge, autonomy, and identity in the waves In Waves of Resistance Isaiah Walker argues that throughout the twentieth century Hawaiian surfers have successfully resisted colonial encroachment in the po ina nalu surf zone The struggle against foreign domination of the waves goes back to the early 1900s, shortly after the overthrow of the Hawaiian kingdom, when proponents of this political seizure helped establish the Outrigger Canoe Club a haoles whites only surfing organization in Waikiki A group of Hawaiian surfers, led by Duke Kahanamoku, united under Hui Nalu to compete openly against their Outrigger rivals and established their authority in the surf.Drawing from Hawaiian language newspapers and oral history interviews, Walker s history of the struggle for the po ina nalu revises previous surf history accounts and unveils the relationship between surfing and colonialism in Hawai i This work begins with a brief look at surfing in ancient Hawai i before moving on to chapters detailing Hui Nalu and other Waikiki surfers of the early twentieth century including Prince Jonah Kuhio , the 1960s radical antidevelopment group Save Our Surf, professional Hawaiian surfers like Eddie Aikau, whose success helped inspire a newfound pride in Hawaiian cultural identity, and finally the North Shore s Hui O He e Nalu, formed in 1976 in response to the burgeoning professional surfing industry that threatened to exclude local surfers from their own beaches Walker also examines how Hawaiian surfers have been empowered by their defiance of haole ideas of how Hawaiian males should behave For example, Hui Nalu surfers successfully combated annexationists, married white women, ran lucrative businesses, and dictated what non Hawaiians could and could not do in their surf even as the popular, tourist driven media portrayed Hawaiian men as harmless and effeminate Decades later, the media were labeling Hawaiian surfers as violent extremists who terrorized haole surfers on the North Shore Yet Hawaiians contested, rewrote, or creatively negotiated with these stereotypes in the waves The po ina nalu became a place where resistance proved historically meaningful and where colonial hierarchies and categories could be transposed.

    1 thought on “Waves of Resistance: Surfing and History in Twentieth-Century Hawaii

    1. This review was written for the class that Dr. Walker teaches, during this particular term we helped in the editing of the book. The critique at the end of the review was accepted by the author and the published edition of the book does not include the issues that I had with it. The title and page numbers do not match the book because we didn't have the completed book for the course.Book Review: HE’E NALU This book tells the history of Hawaii through the eyes of Hawaiian surfers mostly on the [...]

    2. Braving the resistant waves of foreign cultures, colonialism, and repressed identity, Hawaii’s people and their history with surfing have come into their own during the twentieth century. In Isaiah Walker’s book Waves of Resistance the author chronicles the initial suppression of Hawaiian land possessions, culture, language and identity by the colonizing and exploiting West and the subsequent rediscovery – or rebirth – of Hawaiian identity in the 1970s with the advent of pro surfing, th [...]

    3. I am a huge fan of surfing and its history; I agree with Professor Walker's argument that Hawaiians have been misrepresented in or completely written out of the history of surfing (if not all of history). He takes special note of how both the media and gender were used to further strip Hawaiians of their culture, if not completely dehumanize them. I did not like Professor Walker's writing style, which lacked fluidity. I understand why its important -- especially in a book like this -- to use and [...]

    4. The value one gleans from this book could mostly be summarized by the sentence: "Hawaiians actually did resist annexation." The most interesting parts of the book, in which Walker discusses the competency of the Kings, underappreciated by Daws, get only a brief treatment. Generally, the book attempts to generalize too much from a few isolated efforts by nearly all-male surfing groups. Ok, some resistance happened through the 20th century, but what percentage of Hawaiians would really support sec [...]

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