- By Scott Russell Sanders

Writing from the Center

  • Title: Writing from the Center
  • Author: Scott Russell Sanders
  • ISBN: 9780253211439
  • Page: 394
  • Format: Paperback
  • Writing from the Center essays of substance and beauty and they belong beside the work of Annie Dillard Samuel Pickering and Wendell Berry Library Journal Sanders eloquently expresses his love of the land and the responsi

    essays of substance and beauty, and they belong beside the work of Annie Dillard, Samuel Pickering, and Wendell Berry Library Journal Sanders eloquently expresses his love of the land and the responsibility he feels for preventing further erosion of our natural resources Publishers Weekly Skillfully written in a clear, unmannered style refreshingly devoid essays of substance and beauty, and they belong beside the work of Annie Dillard, Samuel Pickering, and Wendell Berry Library Journal Sanders eloquently expresses his love of the land and the responsibility he feels for preventing further erosion of our natural resources Publishers Weekly Skillfully written in a clear, unmannered style refreshingly devoid of irony and hollow cleverness, the author starts with everyday experiences and gleans from them larger truths The Christian Science Monitor These essays are so good one is tempted to stand up and applaud after reading them Sanders is a modern day prospector who finds gems of spiritual meaning in both familiar and unusual places Body Mind SpiritWriting from the Center is about one very fine writer s quest for a meaningful and moral life Lannan Literary Award winner Scott Sanders Secrets of the Universe, Staying Put, A Paradise of Bombs seeks and describes a center that is geographical, emotional, artistic, and spiritual and is rooted in place The geography is midwestern, the impulses are universal The earth needs fewer tourists and inhabitants, it seems to me fewer people who float about in bubbles of money and people committed to knowing and tending their home ground Scott Russell Sanders, from the book

    1 thought on “Writing from the Center

    1. From News of the Wild"What did you find?" my father would ask when I returned from a camping trip or an after-dinner stroll. And I would show him a fossil or feather, tell him how sun lit up the leaves of a hickory, how a skunk looked me over; I would recall for him the taste of elderberries or the rush of wind in white pines or the crunch of locust shells underfoot. Only in that sharing of what I had found was the journey completed, the circle closed.I have put some version of my father's quest [...]

    2. Smoothly written, a lovely flow of a book that entices the reader in and won't let you go until the end. Loved it.

    3. I picked up this little gem of a book for 25 cents in a thrift shop in Nashville, IN, a short trip away from Bloomington where the author is (or was at the time of publication) a professor of English at Indiana University. This is proof that good things can be found in unexpected places.In a collection of a dozen essays, the author explores what it is to live a "meaningful, gathered life in a world that seems broken and scattered." A native Midwesterner (as am I), the author celebrates life in t [...]

    4. Scott Russell Sanders visited our local community college recently. This book is a series of essays describing his quest for a meaningful life. My favorite is titled Letter to a Reader. He reveals more of how he became a writer after considering a career in Science. He shares the how and when of his writingd due to his early life in near poverty, he always had to have a day job (teaching)to support himself and his family. He wrote in many genres: short stories, personal essays, and science ficti [...]

    5. These introspective essays touched me with their slightly melancholic prose, but there was always and underlying message of goodness, joy, contentment. I remember the story about the buckeye, rubbed smooth and dark - like the eye of the buck from where it hails it name. This story, read to me my freshman year of college by my lit prof, transformed my perspective on literature and the world. Definitely a must read for anyone who wants to gain perspective and walk in someone else shoes, if only fo [...]

    6. Who reads essays these days? I got this book through a most circuitous process, and I"m so glad I did. Nothing like an excellent essay to get your thoughts provoked, and to reset your mind into a deep, critical place. Scott Russell Sanders is an excellent writer, and, really, he provoked so much activity in my gray matter that I almost feel like writing my own book of essays in response. I really enjoyed his works, especially "Faith and Work."

    7. Fabulous. I am always chewing on some line from "Buckeye" or "Imagining the Midwest." (Some of the essays are a tad dull at times, but Scott's voice is enjoyable and trustworthy--he's always going to circle back around to wisdom). Now that I'm living in the Midwest, Sanders' work has become so meaningful to me. And Scott is a tremendous guy, too. He lives in and writes about place better than almost anyone save Saint Wendell, and deserves to be known to the widest possible audience.

    8. I haven't met too many people that have moved from the Midwest that don't haughtily praise the virtues of living somewhere else. But the Midwest is a great place to live, dammit, and this book is a loving ode to the natural beauty of the area filled with profound ecological and spiritual meditations. I was not fond of the survey on the literature of the Midwest. The rest I enjoyed.

    9. One of those serendipitous ventures into the realm of the writer's mind as it has happened and how it is ongoing, organic, and that it leads to the center of your own writing integrity, applicable towards just about everyone's situation as a writer. And the stories along the way nudge you the right way.

    10. This was required reading in my first English course as an undergraduate. Some good prose, but I never quite fell for it. 2.5 stars.

    11. What's wrong with writing from a sound, centered state, both professionally and personally? Nothing, argues Scott Russell Sanders in a series if well-reasoned, well-written essays. I agree.

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