- By Dean Nelson Karl W. Giberson

Quantum Leap: How John Polkinghorne Found God in Science and Religion

  • Title: Quantum Leap: How John Polkinghorne Found God in Science and Religion
  • Author: Dean Nelson Karl W. Giberson
  • ISBN: 9780745954011
  • Page: 369
  • Format: Paperback
  • Quantum Leap How John Polkinghorne Found God in Science and Religion Using key events in the life of physicist Sir John Polkinghorne this is an introduction to the central ideas that make the relationship between science and religion such a fascinating field of invest

    Using key events in the life of physicist Sir John Polkinghorne, this is an introduction to the central ideas that make the relationship between science and religion such a fascinating field of investigation An engaging biography cum appraisal of John Polkinghorne s life and work, this book uses his story to approach some of the most important questions in life, includingUsing key events in the life of physicist Sir John Polkinghorne, this is an introduction to the central ideas that make the relationship between science and religion such a fascinating field of investigation An engaging biography cum appraisal of John Polkinghorne s life and work, this book uses his story to approach some of the most important questions in life, including How should a scientist view God Why do we pray, and what do we expect from it Does the universe have a point and What happens after death Sir John Polkinghorne is a British particle physicist who, after 25 years of research and discovery in academia, resigned his post to become an Anglican priest and theologian Since then he has written than 20 books exploring the relationship of science and theology As a physicist, he participated in the research that led to the discovery of the quark, the smallest known particle Here, both his religious and scientific beliefs are explored in full detail A 2011 Crossings Book Club selection.

    1 thought on “Quantum Leap: How John Polkinghorne Found God in Science and Religion

    1. Keeping in mind that this is a book about John Polkinghorne rather than by him, it is a wonderful read. It describes Polkinghorne's career in theoretical physics, his switch to the priesthood, his career as an Anglican priest, his re-entry into academia, and his "retirement." Although this book was not written by Polkinghorne, it is filled with enough Polkinghorne quotations from the numerous interviews that the authors had with him and from his previous books that it almost feels like it was wr [...]

    2. Readers of this journal [Perspectives of Science and Christian Faith] will need no introduction to John Polkinghorne. He is the author of over thirty books on science and faith, including an autobiography; so it was with some surprise that I discovered this new biography. This, however, is no traditional biography. Nelson and Giberson attempt to “tell the story of Polkinghorne, and along the way unfold some bigger issues” (p. 7).We are presented with the life of Polkinghorne, from his birth [...]

    3. This book taught me an illustration explaining how religion and science can coexist: they are two ways of answering the same questions. Polkinghorn presents the question, "why is the water in the kettle on the stove boiling?" A scientist might answer by explaining that heat is transferring between the stove-top and the kettle to the water and that it has raised the kinetic energy of the water above water's boiling point. Another person might answer that the water is boiling because he is going t [...]

    4. Not the best introduction to John Polkinhorne (for that it's best to read the man himself) but an interesting and engaging background to the man and his thought. Typesetting went wrong in places in my edition.

    5. This is an excellent book for anyone interested in how faith and science can work together and the life of John Polkinghorne. A well written book that tackles a lot of big questions, shows both sides of the arguments, and refrains from being 'preachy' about things. I loved it.

    6. An engaging read. However the chapters tended to be too long and meandering in content. Overall I enjoyed this book.

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