- By Matthew K. Gold

Debates in the Digital Humanities

  • Title: Debates in the Digital Humanities
  • Author: Matthew K. Gold
  • ISBN: 9780816677955
  • Page: 268
  • Format: Paperback
  • Debates in the Digital Humanities Encompassing new technologies research methods and opportunities for collaborative scholarship and open source peer review as well as innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching the digital

    Encompassing new technologies, research methods, and opportunities for collaborative scholarship and open source peer review, as well as innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching, the digital humanities promises to transform the liberal arts and perhaps the university itself Indeed, at a time when many academic institutions are facing austerity budgets, digital Encompassing new technologies, research methods, and opportunities for collaborative scholarship and open source peer review, as well as innovative ways of sharing knowledge and teaching, the digital humanities promises to transform the liberal arts and perhaps the university itself Indeed, at a time when many academic institutions are facing austerity budgets, digital humanities programs have been able to hire new faculty, establish new centers and initiatives, and attract multimillion dollar grants Clearly the digital humanities has reached a significant moment in its brief history But what sort of moment is it Debates in the Digital Humanities brings together leading figures in the field to explore its theories, methods, and practices and to clarify its multiple possibilities and tensions From defining what a digital humanist is and determining whether the field has or needs theoretical grounding, to discussions of coding as scholarship and trends in data driven research, this cutting edge volume delineates the current state of the digital humanities and envisions potential futures and challenges At the same time, several essays aim pointed critiques at the field for its lack of attention to race, gender, class, and sexuality the inadequate level of diversity among its practitioners its absence of political commitment and its preference for research over teaching.Together, the essays in Debates in the Digital Humanities which will be published both as a printed book and later as an ongoing, open access website suggest that the digital humanities is uniquely positioned to contribute to the revival of the humanities and academic life.Contributors Bryan Alexander, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education Rafael Alvarado, U of Virginia Jamie Skye Bianco, U of Pittsburgh Ian Bogost, Georgia Institute of Technology Stephen Brier, CUNY Graduate Center Daniel J Cohen, George Mason U Cathy N Davidson, Duke U Rebecca Frost Davis, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education Johanna Drucker, U of California, Los Angeles Amy E Earhart, Texas AM U Charlie Edwards Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Pomona College Julia Flanders, Brown U Neil Fraistat, U of Maryland Paul Fyfe, Florida State U Michael Gavin, Rice U David Greetham, CUNY Graduate Center Jim Groom, U of Mary Washington Gary Hall, Coventry U, UK Mills Kelly, George Mason U Matthew Kirschenbaum, U of Maryland Alan Liu, U of California, Santa Barbara Elizabeth Losh, U of California, San Diego Lev Manovich, U of California, San Diego Willard McCarty, King s College London Tara McPherson, U of Southern California Bethany Nowviskie, U of Virginia Trevor Owens, Library of Congress William Pannapacker, Hope College Dave Parry, U of Texas at Dallas Stephen Ramsay, U of Nebraska, Lincoln Alexander Reid, SUNY at Buffalo Geoffrey Rockwell, Canadian Institute for Research Computing in the Arts Mark L Sample, George Mason U Tom Scheinfeldt, George Mason U Kathleen Marie Smith Lisa Spiro, National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education Patrik Svensson, Ume U Luke Waltzer, Baruch College Matthew Wilkens, U of Notre Dame George H Williams, U of South Carolina Upstate Michael Wit, Folger Shakespeare Library.

    1 thought on “Debates in the Digital Humanities

    1. This is a great text, published in a very bleeding edge format (The complicated process of academic compilation publication made manifest in only a years time). It is a kind of reference book, when read in its most relevant context. The text itself is primarily conversation, contributors made up primarily of authors that have written some brilliant academic material talking about, and more often than not trying to pin down, the burgeoning field that is Digital Humanities; a field the majority of [...]

    2. English, history, and media studies scholars believe that digital humanities has the power to reshape academic practice. How this will be done is the source of academic debate. Questions posed in the book include: Why are scholars slower to adopt multimedia projects as legitimate forms of publication? When will multimedia projects be acceptable forms of dissertation research? How might scholars use data collected from multimedia sources in academic research? The main theme of this book is how to [...]

    3. I tend to think of this as a useful snapshot of the state of debates in DH, but it's important to remember that most of these debates are continuing, and even continued in the comment sections below some of the blog posts featured in the book.Not that it's all blog posts. There are a fair number of 5-20 page essays.

    4. Great introduction (albeit somewhat repetitive in places) to the major debates in the field. Nice to see the open peer review concept at work. I particularly enjoyed the essays in the "theorizing" part of the book, as well as Alan Liu's concluding paper on rethinking the future of DH as a culturally informed practice.

    5. Read my subpar review here: timlepczyk/2014/04/29/debates-digital-humanitiesml. Subpar is describing my review, not the book.

    6. Just starting this. Reading excerpts of the text with my First Year Composition colleagues at St. John's University.

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