- By Ann Rinaldi

The Fifth of March: A Story of the Boston Massacre (Great Episodes)

  • Title: The Fifth of March: A Story of the Boston Massacre (Great Episodes)
  • Author: Ann Rinaldi
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 189
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The Fifth of March A Story of the Boston Massacre Great Episodes It s and fourteen year old Rachel Marsh is a servant in the Boston household of John Adams But her loyalty to the Adams family is tested by her friendship with Matthew Kilroy a British private

    It s 1770, and fourteen year old Rachel Marsh is a servant in the Boston household of John Adams But her loyalty to the Adams family is tested by her friendship with Matthew Kilroy, a British private with an unsavory reputation Rachel knows Matthew is frustrated and angry, but even she is surprised when he is accused of joining soldiers in firing upon a mob of citizens.It s 1770, and fourteen year old Rachel Marsh is a servant in the Boston household of John Adams But her loyalty to the Adams family is tested by her friendship with Matthew Kilroy, a British private with an unsavory reputation Rachel knows Matthew is frustrated and angry, but even she is surprised when he is accused of joining soldiers in firing upon a mob of citizens in the bloody encounter that came to be known as the Boston Massacre Carefully researched and lovingly written, Rinaldi s latest presents a girl indentured to John and Abigail Adams during the tense period surrounding the 1770 Massacre Fortuitously timed, a novel that illuminates a moment from our past that has strong parallels to recent events Bibliography Kirkus Reviews

    1 thought on “The Fifth of March: A Story of the Boston Massacre (Great Episodes)

    1. Reading through my shelves of juvenile books, I chose another Rinaldi historical fiction. I've yet to find a Rinaldi I didn't enjoy. She seems to have researched her topics well and then adds enough realism to plunk the reader, or at least me, down in the midst of the historical situation. This time, I was with the John Adams family as the children's caretaker, Rachel Marsh.Rachel, at age twelve, learns what liberty is, what it means to be free. She is befriended by the Adams' acquaintance Henry [...]

    2. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the first half of the book. 4 stars for the reading. Minus one star for my unresolved questions at the end. Such a sad situation for the British soldiers in Boston. I enjoyed reading about the turmoil in Boston and as people try to "pick their sides" during a time when they were still loyalists. Revolution was not yet being called out on the streets. But, there was a hunger for liberty in Boston. **Spoiler alter**The second half the book had "issues" I wish were expl [...]

    3. DNF. I love Ann Rinaldi; but this particular novel revolves around an extremely problematic romance (guy claims girl 'owes' him affection, girl feels guilty for setting boundaries), and I just don't feel like putting up with that kind of nonsense right now.

    4. Okay. I know that I should write a real review of this, but it'd be too critical.I have to wonder if Ann Rinaldi did ANY research. I don't know that much about the Adams, having only read 6 or so books completely about them, but I found GAPING holes and horrible mistakes. Okay, not horrible, but still.And the name dropping in this book? Wow. Way to drop Henry Knox, MERCY OTIS WARREN!, Samuel Adams, John Hancock, Thomas Hutchinson all of whom the Adams had contact, but I did wonder what happened [...]

    5. This book was very good. I've read one other of Ann Rinaldi's books and enjoyed it immensely as well for her writing style is superb and her story telling amazing although this book was a little slow in the beginning (This is usual though and predictable for a historical fiction book). I really felt like I was with Rachel as she walked through the streets of Boston and by the end of the book I was turning pages so fast to see what happens next I almost got a paper cut. So yeah this book was real [...]

    6. Rinaldi is a brilliant and creative story-tellere two stars aren't a reflection of the author, just this story. Maybe 'historical' 'fiction' isn't my cup o tea. I found the protagonist to be completely unbelievable! Her choices, her actions were soooo 21st century, and, I couldn't reconcile that with the time period the story is set. Rinaldi states that the catalyst for this story was the riots in L A in 1992 -- maybe her story should have just been written with that as the setting instead of ex [...]

    7. I really liked this YA Historical Fiction novel. I am currently homeschooling my girls and trying to figure out how to inspire them to desire to learn on their own. I appreciated the heroine in this book who had a great desire to 'make something of herself' and determined in her mind that learning and books were the tools to help her do that. She also found a mentor or two to help her along her way. I plan to read this out loud to my girls next year when we are studying American History.

    8. Growing up my favorite author was hands down Ann Rinaldi. I owned probably about a dozen or so of them and I would frequently borrow those that I didn’t own from the school library. After about age 15 I got distracted by other books and really forgot all about this author until a few weeks ago. I was exploring the author’s website for a feature I was doing on YA Historical Fiction and realized that she has still been releasing books, almost every year, and still is. This made me want to take [...]

    9. The events surrounding the Boston Massacre as perceived by a maid in the Adams' household whose name was Rachel and is in the process of figuring out who she is and what her values are, and she wants to become. Probably one of Rinaldi's more readable books and she's a bit less heavy handed with the fact dropping than in most of her other books. Not sure I particularly like this character all that much, but I could see it being very appealing to girls who are themselves deeply insecure. Also, the [...]

    10. I was very excited at first to read The Fifth of March: A Story of the Boston Massacre. I usually enjoy Ann Rinaldi's books, and was eager to start this one. The beginning was very good. There were strong characters, a historically accurate setting, and a clear plot line. As the book progressed, however, I began to lose interest. Rachel (the main protagonist) became overly naive and clueless, and her "friend" Matthew was clingy and sometimes just plain rude. I understand that Rachel was a real h [...]

    11. Photina HaumschiltGenre: Historical FictionRachel Marsh is an indentured servant to John and Abigail Adams in Boston, Massachusetts. Her job in the Adams' house is to care for their children. On her off days she yearns to better herself and starts going to the local bookstore to read books and learn. As the British soldiers arrive in Boston tensions start to become more apparent and people choose sides. Rachel is torn as she befriends a British soldier, Matthew Kilroy. Her Loyalties and own beli [...]

    12. I read this because I was a fan of Rinaldi's book Acquaintance with Darkness. I didn't think I would enjoy a historical fiction book, but I really liked reading it!It started off kinda boring, but as the first couple of chapters went on, it became a great book with a well-written plot.I noticed that not all of the historical information in here was correct. But most of the time, it was. (Rinaldi wrote "Townsend Acts" instead of "Townshend Acts") The parts about the Boston Massacre were very accu [...]

    13. Story of the Boston Massacre through the eyes of Rachel Marsh, who is a servant working for John and Abigail Adams. It's definitely a book geared for a younger readert a lot of meat to it but a good story. I thought she brought up some good points about liberty and what it means to be an "American". We don't need anyone.cluding the government, to "do for us". We can do for ourselves. It seems that many in our country have lost that attitude which makes this book a good one for young adults to re [...]

    14. One of the marks of a really good book for me is when it inspires me to do more reading on the subject matter on my own. This young adult telling of a young indentured girls growth in knowledge and self-understanding did that for me. I come in part from Loyalist ancestors and when I visited Boston the first time and saw the marker for the "Boston Massacre" I didn't believe it was a massacre at all. This book didn't change my opinion on that. but I found it to be a well-researched and well-balanc [...]

    15. So, this was one of my favorite books when I was younger and when I recently cleaned out my bookshelves I decided I wanted to read it again. It was definitely worth reading again too.Now that I'm older I understand more of what the book is about; that it's not just about a servant girl who had a friendship with a British solder. And that Rachel asked questions that we all should ask, that myself at 20 am still asking myself.This is a beautifully written piece of historical fiction that can be en [...]

    16. This was my first book by: Ann Rinaldi, so besides the reference to other books by the author, I agree with this review written by Hannah: Not my favorite book by this author. Her stories normally have a happier ending and/or more redeeming qualities and fewer suggestive scenes. Enjoyed the perspective and history. This author always does a great job making it personal and this book was no exception. Disappointed with the cursing and rebellion. It was a little heavy on woman's independence/right [...]

    17. This book wasn't terrible, but it definitely wasn't great. It was ok. There were things that annoyed me about it- mainly the characters *cough cough* KILROY, but other than that it was just a meh, no-emotion book. I would not read it again, but I would still recommend it to some people, especially history-loving Americans, because it is very patriotic. Overall, it just wasn't my cup of tea, and Ann Rinaldi's writing was not anything spectacular.

    18. I thought this book was a well written story about the Indentured servant of John and Abigail Adams. This is a strong example of descriptive detail. The struggling relationship between Rachel Marsh and Matthew Kilroy is a way to relate to the audience. Overall, I thought this book was an interesting story of the Boston Massacre from the eyes of a young girl.

    19. I thought that this book by Ann Rinaldi, was very good. It also had tons of accurate facts, and I was able to learn from this book. The only thing negative thing I would say about this book, is that I wish the ending was different.

    20. There were things about this I really liked and things I wasn't so fond of. She does a great job showing the rising tensions in Boston in the years leading up to the Revolution, and how events progressed from being something only the politically minded really cared about to something everyone had to have a stake in. She also did a good job, I thought, of showing both sides of the story - that the Bostonians resented the British troops' presence and they signified, and the troops were overworked, [...]

    21. A young adult (12+) historical fiction about the happenings in Boston leading up to the Boston Massacre. The main character is Rachel Marsh, age 14, living with John Adams and his family as a caretaker of his young children. The book has coming-of-age themes as Rachel sorts through the rapidly dividing thoughts of the day regarding being a "British-American" vs. just an "American". Throughout the book she also solidifies in her mind what the concept of liberty is and what it means in her own lif [...]

    22. I loved this book. I really like Rachel , although i didn't agree with her actions at the end of the book. I really wish we could know more with what happened to her once she left the care of the Adams. I have to admit , i didn't have high hopes for this book, not for the fact of the story or what the book was about but for the fact that it was a YA book. But i had read a couple of books by Ann Rinaldi when i was a teenage and i loved her writing style and how she brings the charcthers to life a [...]

    23. Meh. First, the Hamilton musical made John Adams into a laughingstock, so it took a while to see him as an ideal employer he is portrayed as in this book. Clearly, literary license has been taken with the amount of time the Adamses spend talking to Rachel about political events, and also with the number of historical things Rachel witnesses.In its favor, it did make me think about the situation of the enlisted British soldiers in Boston. In elementary school, all we were taught was the knee-jerk [...]

    24. Geared toward YA audience, but not juvenile. The author does her history homework to keep this historical fiction more historical than fiction, but adds topics about young love that aren't necessary for younger audiences.

    25. I thought it was an amazing book. I love historical fiction, and Ann Rinaldi is one of my favorite authors.

    26. this book was horible it made me want to kill matthew kilroy and uncle bob!!!!!!!!! please kill them!!!!!!!!

    27. I really liked this one, might be my fav of hers.Main Character: Rachel Marsh an indentured servant to the children of John Adams.

    28. Cataloging summary: Fourteen-year old Rachel Marsh, an indentured servant in the Boston household of John and Abigail Adams, is caught up in the colonists 19 unrest that eventually escalates into the massacre of March 5, 1770.One of the strengths of this book is the melding of historical facts with fictional ideas. Ann Rinaldi is known for her works of historical fiction, and this is one of them. Rinaldi does extensive research for her novels and then interprets the events to make her own story. [...]

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