- By William Hogeland

Founding Finance: How Debt, Speculation, Foreclosures, Protests, and Crackdowns Made Us a Nation

  • Title: Founding Finance: How Debt, Speculation, Foreclosures, Protests, and Crackdowns Made Us a Nation
  • Author: William Hogeland
  • ISBN: 9780292743618
  • Page: 461
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Founding Finance How Debt Speculation Foreclosures Protests and Crackdowns Made Us a Nation Recent movements such as the Tea Party and anti tax constitutional conservatism lay claim to the finance and taxation ideas of America s founders but how much do we really know about the dramatic cla

    Recent movements such as the Tea Party and anti tax constitutional conservatism lay claim to the finance and taxation ideas of America s founders, but how much do we really know about the dramatic clashes over finance and economics that marked the founding of America Dissenting from both right wing claims and certain liberal preconceptions, Founding Finance brings to liRecent movements such as the Tea Party and anti tax constitutional conservatism lay claim to the finance and taxation ideas of America s founders, but how much do we really know about the dramatic clashes over finance and economics that marked the founding of America Dissenting from both right wing claims and certain liberal preconceptions, Founding Finance brings to life the violent conflicts over economics, class, and finance that played directly, and in many ways ironically, into the hardball politics of forming the nation and ratifying the Constitution conflicts that still continue to affect our politics, legislation, and debate today.Mixing lively narrative with fresh views of America s founders, William Hogeland offers a new perspective on America s economic infancy foreclosure crises that make our current one look mild investment bubbles in land and securities that drove rich men to high risk borrowing and mad displays of ostentation before dropping them into debtors prisons depressions longer and deeper than the great one of the twentieth century crony mercantilism, war profiteering, and government corruption that undermine any nostalgia for a virtuous early republic and predatory lending of scarce cash at exorbitant, unregulated rates, which forced people into bankruptcy, landlessness, and working in the factories and on the commercial farms of their creditors This story exposes and corrects a perpetual historical denial by movements across the political spectrum of America s all important founding economic clashes, a denial that weakens and cheapens public discourse on American finance just when we need it most.

    1 thought on “Founding Finance: How Debt, Speculation, Foreclosures, Protests, and Crackdowns Made Us a Nation

    1. I was led to this book while doing research on the early history of the U.S. economy. This book is an eye-opener! American history is full of a lot of insane and shocking things that school textbooks generally leave out. Alexander Hamilton is thought by many as a national hero, but he instituted an American economic system based on benefits for the wealthy and a system of U.S. debt to be paid off by taxpayers. Sound familiar? He also convinced Washington to organize the first official U.S. milit [...]

    2. This was a surprising book, both in that I learned many new things about the revolutionary time period but also in the direct way the author engages other historians that appear to have covered up or at least disregarded interesting facts about what we would now call the class conflicts between various actors in that period. Run on sentence, run on!Looking forward to more books from this series. It was a very good read and offers a well-nuanced dose of history.

    3. Thought provoking, and definitely raises some interesting questions. For me though it's far too revisionist, too many assertions and assumptions that are not proven. Two smaller mistakes I caught is that the author called Voltaire, the proud frenchman Swiss, and his claim that the creation of the upper unelected house (the senate) stifled the radical state legislatures doesn't make any sense, considering that the senate before the progressive era was elected by individual state legislatures.

    4. Well-written but dry as the Sonoran. Eminently readable even for an American History retard like myself.

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