- By Dori Sanders

Clover

  • Title: Clover
  • Author: Dori Sanders
  • ISBN: 9781616203405
  • Page: 279
  • Format: Paperback
  • Clover Clover Hill is ten years old when her father the principal of the local elementary school marries a white woman Sara Kate Just hours later an automobile accident compels Clover to forge a relation

    Clover Hill is ten years old when her father, the principal of the local elementary school, marries a white woman, Sara Kate Just hours later, an automobile accident compels Clover to forge a relationship with the new stepmother she hardly knows in this beautiful, enduring novel about a family lost and found First published by Algonquin in 1990 and winner of the LillianClover Hill is ten years old when her father, the principal of the local elementary school, marries a white woman, Sara Kate Just hours later, an automobile accident compels Clover to forge a relationship with the new stepmother she hardly knows in this beautiful, enduring novel about a family lost and found First published by Algonquin in 1990 and winner of the Lillian Smith Award for Southern literature that enhances racial awareness, Clover is a national bestseller and has been recommended reading for classrooms across the country Now on our thirtieth anniversary we have the pleasure of republishing this Algonquin classic in trade paperback, with an original essay by the author In the spirit of Cold Sassy Tree and The Secret Life of Bees, Clover is a witty, insightful classic for readers of all ages.

    1 thought on “Clover

    1. I wanted to like this one more than I did. There are passages that stood out for me--moments where Sanders creates interesting, distinct characters, like the old woman who has no foil in her house because she uses it to wrap endless five-dollar bills to send to television evangelists. And there are some moments of personality and humor, like when ten year-old Clover observes her white stepmother struggling to adapt her palate to a rural southern African-American diet (read: pigs' feet, sweet tea [...]

    2. I won this book from LibraryThing's September give away. When this book arrived this Friday, I sat down to see what it was about and where in the pile of my unread books it would go. Well, I read it straight through! Clover is a precocious 10 year old who on her father's wedding day becomes an orphan with a brand new stepmother she barely knows. It's a truly beautiful story about what makes a family. While this book was written in 1990, it's just as fresh as if it was just written.

    3. I'm disappointed that I didn't like this book more. I read a wonderful article about Dori Sanders in an old Gourmet magazine, and it made me want to read this book. Reviewers compared the character of Clover (a 10 year old black girl raised by her white step mother after her father dies) to Scout in To Kill a Mockingbird and Will Tweedy in Cold Sassy Tree. I have to disagree. As much as I wanted to like this book, I thought the writing was disjointed (sentences seemed to be out of order or didn' [...]

    4. Heard Dori speak at PLA in Charlotte NC on 3/31/00. She told some great stories including one about an elderly lady who's daughter is horrified to learn that a Meals on Wheels volunteer type has stolen all her mother's "heirlooms" which the daughter herself had no interest in, and the mother could care less about the theft but appreciated the personal attention she got from the volunteer as opposed to the daughter's bossy phone calls from afar.

    5. I had the pleasure of meeting Dori Sanders in 1995 when she spoke at an event at the Huntsville Public Library. She was a delight to meet. Her book, Clover, is wonderfully written. She has done a wonderful job of getting into the mind of a 10-year-old child who has just lost her father. Here is an excerpt from the inside book cover:“Clover is ten years old when her father, Gaten Hill, the principal of an elementary school, marries a white woman, Sara Kate. Hours later there is an automobile ac [...]

    6. When I requested this book I thought it was right up my alley it sounded like something I should love I have been trying to read this little book for weeks, it just didn't grab me and was very easy to put down and try something else. The writing is sparse and I wanted more, I wish there had been more background on Gaten and Sara Kate instead of jumping right in with his death , it was hard to tell just how long Gaten and Sara Kate had been dating before they married. There were also times it was [...]

    7. I found this to be a sweet, simple book telling of the forced-upon relationship between child and step-mother. Though I'm still unsure as to the audience, I feel this sensitive book would be enjoyed by anyone from 'tweenaged to adult. Since it was short in length, it lacked the depth that might have made it even more compelling (as its jacket promised), yet the story of an African American child and a white woman was a tender one, and worth the read nonetheless. And, as it was published in Chape [...]

    8. This book is sort of a slow read. Not to mention, the book is hard to follow because of the frequent time frame switches. Also, I do not believe any of the characters in the book were fully developed. & the book really lacked any real drama. The most interesting thing that happened was when Gaten (Clover's father) dies. & that event is not even dramatized. Yet, do not get me wrong, I loved the implied concept of the book. The main concept that I took from the book was do not be so quick [...]

    9. This was a relatively short novel, but it took me a long time to finish it. It is the story of 10 year old Clover whose father, Gaten, dies in a car accident shortly after his marriage to a white woman Sara Kate. Sara Kate was also injured in the car accident but she stays to raise Clover even though she has only been her stepmother for a matter of weeks. I liked that the story is narrated by Clover; it felt like reading journal entries. The reason I'm rating it 2 stars is that the story didn't [...]

    10. Though I wasn't blown away, I liked Dori Sanders' writing better than that of many other local authors. Her prose is charmingly simple, which is appropriate since the narrator is a 10-year-old girl. Some of the dialog is a bit awkward, and the novel's structure is rambling at times. However, I liked the honest portrayal of prejudice within the African-American community--definitely not PC.

    11. I really wanted to enjoy this book, but did not. The entire book is written in the language of the young girl who is the main character. It seemed so very scattered and her introduction of new characters constantly had you flipping back in the book to see "who is this and have I met them and forgotten?" Some in my book club liked it better than I, but had the same comments regarding the writing style and character introductions.

    12. I actually enjoyed this book, it was short and an easy read. I enjoyed the descriptions of life on a peach farm and getting to know the black family that ran it. Written from a ten year old's perspective, there were some really amusing stories as the main character tries to adjust to living with her white step mother, after her father's death. I don't know that this was great literature, but for entertainment, it was a fun read.

    13. I felt in love with Clover, a young black girl whose dad marries a white woman, then dies in an accident a few hours later. Clover's stepmother takes over her upbringing even though they barely know each other, and Clover learns about barriers, shared loss, and real love as they forge a new life without her daddy. Truly sweet, poignant, and funny.

    14. The Southern characters use convincing black vernacular and portray the culture of the south. It is a story of family, a story of family lost and found.

    15. I loved this book because it reminded me about how hard it is to lose a family member. This book made me so sad but it was a very beautiful story about forgiveness and prejudice.

    16. This book show's the love between a biracial couple. It seen through the eyes of a ten year old. I recommend this to book to everyone I know. Make me smile, cry and laugh. Refreshing!!!!

    17. An easy read, some humor. Interesting perspective from the 10 year old. Not awful, but really not great either l.

    18. I'm still not sure what the point of this book is. It's not historical, it's not about anything significant and it doesn't have a climactic peak.

    19. A ten-year-old black girl is being raised by her father when he suddenly dies. Now she's left with her white stepmother who she's only met a couple of times. Story is about how she and her other black relatives react to that as well as how the stepmom fits it or doesn't. Some parts were good but others were just filled with big time generalizations.

    20. Closer to 3.5 stars. Beautifully written story that is heartbreaking but ends on hope. Shows the power of prejudice and how people could change their attitudes toward one another if they would just stop to get to know people as people and not by the color of their skin.

    21. I have conflicting thoughts about this young adult fiction novel. I like the fact that it deals with race relations - in the family and community in the 1980's - and from the innocent eyes of a ten-year-old child. Yet, Clover, the child-narrator, has been through so much in her young life that her emotions do not adequately reflect her recent traumas. Intellectually her pain is stated, but emotionally, that deep raw ache such an age and experience would normally elicit,  is not palpable.Likewis [...]

    22. I'm disappointed I had hoped to really enjoy this book. I cannot give it 1 star & say that I didn't like it But neither can I give it 3 stars for saying that I liked it. I guess the 2-star rating of "it was ok" will have to suffice. The hardest part of this book, for me, was the lack of "togetherness". It did not flow well. It jumped all over the place without warning. Stories of Clover and Gaten were appearing after he had died without any lead-up to a reminiscent moment. All of a sudden--B [...]

    23. Hours after his wedding to Sara Kate, Gaten dies in a car accident, leaving behind his widow and his ten year old daughter, Clover.Clover, gifted but strong-willed, is not quite ready to embrace the new stepmother she hardly knows. They have differences in race -- Sara Kate is white, while Clover is black -- and in background -- Sara Kate is a highly educated, cultured city girl, while Clover has lived all her life in rural Round Hill, South Carolina. Clover's beloved Aunt Everleen is also none [...]

    24. This book had a good concept behind it - a white woman marries a black man in a black community, and shortly afterwards her husband dies, leaving her to care for her dead husband's young daughter. The story is told from the daughter Clover's point of view as the community struggles to accept this white and privileged woman in their midst. I picked up the book at a book fair and bought it for fifty cents, thinking it might be worth a glance. The truth is, the book is pretty much unreadable. Not o [...]

    25. A young black girl in South Carolina loses her father to a car accident the very day he marries a white woman. Clover is left in the care of her new stepmother, Sara Kate, and must come to terms with the differences between them and she insightfully discerns Sara Kate’s efforts to fit into Clover’s family and community.Clover has a child’s sensibility and a way of viewing the world that is dependent upon how much is inadvertently revealed to her when adults are ignorant of her presence. Th [...]

    26. Clover is very great story about a little girl whose life changes. One minute later she has a father and a white stepmother but 4 days after the wedding Gaten (Clover father) and Sara Kate ( Clover stepmother). They get in a horrible car crash only Sara Kate survives. Clover has to deal with a new stepmother that she only knows for 4 days. She doesn’t get along with Sara Kate and her Aunt Everleen doesn’t help Clover keeps hearing her aunt saying bad stuff about Sara Kate. Clover knows it’ [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *