- By Cheryl Minnema Wesley Ballinger

Hungry Johnny

  • Title: Hungry Johnny
  • Author: Cheryl Minnema Wesley Ballinger
  • ISBN: 9780873519267
  • Page: 249
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Hungry Johnny I like to eat eat eat choruses young Johnny as he watches Grandma at work in the kitchen Wild rice fried potatoes fruit salad frosted sweet rolls what a feast Johnny can hardly contain his excit

    I like to eat, eat, eat, choruses young Johnny as he watches Grandma at work in the kitchen Wild rice, fried potatoes, fruit salad, frosted sweet rolls what a feast Johnny can hardly contain his excitement In no time, he ll be digging in with everyone else, filling his belly with all this good food But wait First there is the long drive to the community center And I like to eat, eat, eat, choruses young Johnny as he watches Grandma at work in the kitchen Wild rice, fried potatoes, fruit salad, frosted sweet rolls what a feast Johnny can hardly contain his excitement In no time, he ll be digging in with everyone else, filling his belly with all this good food But wait First there is the long drive to the community center And then an even longer Ojibwe prayer And then well, young boys know to follow the rules elders eat first, no matter how hungry the youngsters are Johnny lingers with Grandma, worried that the tasty treats won t last Seats at the tables fill and refill platters are emptied and then replaced Will it ever be their turn And will there be enough As Johnny watches anxiously, Grandma gently teaches By the time her friend Katherine arrives late to the gathering, Johnny knows just what to do, hunger pangs or no He understands, just as Grandma does, that gratitude, patience, and respect are rewarded by a place at the table and plenty to eat, eat, eat Writer and beadwork artist Cheryl Kay Minnema is a member of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Artist Wesley Ballinger, also a member of the Mille Lacs Band, works for the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission.

    1 thought on “Hungry Johnny

    1. Hungry Johnny by Cheryl Minnema is a picture book with high appeal. The story of a young boy being forced to wait to eat at a community event will feel very familiar to readers. I also appreciated how Hungry Johnny serves as an example of how one can capture a family story to paper. Finally, the accompanying artwork by Wesley Ballinger assists in showing a blend of old and new in this Ojibwe tale of family and community values.From one observation of her brother, Minnema has created a story that [...]

    2. A modern story of Native American Indian culture (in particular, this book is an Ojibwe tribe) gathering for a community feast; it teaches why little Johnny should show respect and wait for the Elders to have their meals before he can eat. Text is engaging and easy to follow. Illustrations are lively (although a few are a little odd looking) showing an accurate representation of modern First Nations people.

    3. I loved this book. It teaches about customs in a way that we all can understand.I work in a Spanish 4K class we have a child that is from a bicultural background and he immediately identified with the little boy being impatient and asked the same question "What is a baby Elder?" and he understood it right away!The illustrations were spot on!

    4. A nice lesson on patience for young children. Might be added to the current concern about diversity in children's books, as the author and illustrator are Ojibwe, giving it a special appeal in Minnesota and the upper Midwest.

    5. A fun own voices story by and about the Ojibwe tribe and the sense of community (& good food)!

    6. Hungry Johnny is about Johnny who is five years old being a normally little boy when he is hungry. Johnny is outside playing when his stomach starts to rumble so he runs inside to get food, however his is not allowed to have any because it was for the community feast. Soon after that they go to the community feast where all Johnny could think about is food and how he “likes to EAT, EAT, EAT.” After a man gives a prayer people starts to line up and Johnny did not understand why they got to go [...]

    7. This book is about a boy that likes to eat. All he can think about is food while he is playing with his toys waiting. When he tries to eat she tells him it is for the community feast. He gets very disappointed because he knows he will have to wait for a long time. When it is finally time to go he jumps up and sings about how much he likes to eat. He does the same in the car as they drive to the Community feast. When they got there he had to wait for them to say a very long prayer. Then he jumped [...]

    8. In the book, Hungry Johnny, written by Cheryl Minnema, tells the story about a young boy named Johnny who one day while sitting in his snow dome discovers that he is very hungry. Every time poor Johnny tries to eat his grandma stops him. There is always a reason why she stops hi though, of course she doesn't want him to starve. She is trying to teach him to be polite and respectful. The lesson that I learned from the story was to respect your elders. "Age before beauty." I would say the illustra [...]

    9. This was a very sweet little book about a boy named Johnny. Johnny is Ojibwe and his community is going to have a feast. The problem is Johnny likes to eat, eat, eat! At the community feast, Johnny learns that it is important to let the elders eat first out of respect. Johnny finally gets to the table to eat when his grandmother's friend arrives. She is an elder. Johnny jumps up and gives her his chair. She lets him sit on her lap and they both eat their fill. The story teaches respect and patie [...]

    10. This is a story of native American tribal members and Johnny. There a is dinner being prepared and Johnny is learning to be respectful of his elders at the community center. The wait for Johnny is long and yet he waits with his grandmother until it is his turn to join in the meal. A story that will show how things are done in other communities they may not be familiar with and how waiting can be worth it in the end.

    11. I like how this book had translations for three separate words or sayings spoken throughout the book. It is a good way to make the reader feel involved and is perfect to read to a class to see if they can remember what each word or saying means throughout the story. I like the message this book brought forth.

    12. A engaging story about waiting your turn for something wonderful that all young children will identify with. Set in a contemporary Ojibwe community--don't miss the tiny glossary box on the copyright page (although I wish phonetic pronunciation had also been provided). Would be a great addition to a storytime about food or community or grandmothers.

    13. A great story to help students understand the meaning of respect and patience. We can discuss as a class ways to show respect to others. I would then have the students write a sentence or two about respect to go with our classroom rules. It also has a few Ojibwe words which the students could investigate and find the meaning.

    14. The text wonderfully describes why they have certain traditions, but the illustrations leave much to be desired.

    15. not a fan of the illustrations (kind of creepy) and why didn't Johnny get a little snack before they left?

    16. This is a story that young children would be able to relate to because waiting for a sweet treat can be difficult - very difficult. This is a nice book to add to a collection because it takes place within a modern Native community. It is rich in culture and is about learning patience and respecting elders.

    17. I liked the story, and I think books like this one are valuable; it features Native American characters, settings, and values, but it's a contemporary story about a cheerful everyday adventure. Unfortunately, the art is incredibly off-putting for me.

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