- By Osamu Dazai James J. O'Brien

Crackling Mountain and Other Stories

  • Title: Crackling Mountain and Other Stories
  • Author: Osamu Dazai James J. O'Brien
  • ISBN: 9780804833424
  • Page: 429
  • Format: Paperback
  • Crackling Mountain and Other Stories Features outstanding works by Osamu Dazai widely regarded as one of th century Japan s most gifted writers and a master teller of tales Dazai experimented with a wide variety of short story styl

    Features 11 outstanding works by Osamu Dazai, widely regarded as one of 20th century Japan s most gifted writers and a master teller of tales Dazai experimented with a wide variety of short story styles and brought to each a sophisticated sense of humor, a broad empathy for the human condition, and a tremendous literary talent This book showcases a range of his styles frFeatures 11 outstanding works by Osamu Dazai, widely regarded as one of 20th century Japan s most gifted writers and a master teller of tales Dazai experimented with a wide variety of short story styles and brought to each a sophisticated sense of humor, a broad empathy for the human condition, and a tremendous literary talent This book showcases a range of his styles from the poignant childhood recollections of Memories , to the samurai buffoonery of A Poor Man s Got His Pride , to reworked folk classics such as the title story By turns hilarious, ironic, introspective, mystical and sarcastic, the eleven stories present the most fully rounded portrait available of a tragic, multifaceted genius of modern Japanese letters.

    1 thought on “Crackling Mountain and Other Stories

    1. I'd first encountered Lane Dunlop's translation of "Memories" in A Late Chrysanthemum: Twenty-One Stories from the Japanese. I didn't remember this little paragraph:"A busy man, my father was seldom at home. Even when he was, he usually didn't bother about his children. I once wanted a fountain pen like his, but was too afraid to ask for one. After wrestling with the problem, I fell back on pretending to talk in my sleep. Lying in bed one evening, I kept murmuring, Fountain pen fountain pen Fa [...]

    2. This collection of short stories, Crackling Mountain and Other Stories, by Dazai Osamu is a witty display of prose writing. Many of his stories are retellings of older Japanese classics. With it he sets the criterion for the ingenious use of ironic humor, which, in the case of Dazai, is always dark.The last story in this collection, Crackling Mountain delves into the notion of vengence. The story is amusing with animals taking the lead roles, as they so often do in his narratives. Here our main [...]

    3. Membaca karya Dazai yang beberapa kali cuba membunuh diri ini (akhirnya mati membunuh diri dengan teman wanitanya), saya jangkakan pengalaman semacam rasa kosong, mundane, mendatar seperti yang rasa tatkala menelaah karya Murakami.Wah, rupanya boleh tahan berwarna-warni cerpen-cerpen Dazai. Ada kepelbagaian emosi dan kekayaan persoalan melibatkan manusia dan juga haiwan.

    4. Slick collection of stories from one of Japan's most significant 20th century authors, Dazai's "Crackling Mountain" is mostly a rich retelling of classic Japanese stories, reshaped to reflect and draw sense to World War 2-era Japan, leading, during, and following the war.I've little to say about these stories as I am not familiar with the original texts they reappropriate. I'm no scholar of Japanese literature, but I have read a certain quantity of anthologies where classic Japanese tales have b [...]

    5. Most people seem to start with No Longer Human when reading Dazai, but I chose this one because it was cheaper (and I love short stories, of course). I'm glad, because it's a really diverse collection of brilliant stories. He's more comical than I expected (the author died young from a double suicide), but just as poignant as I figured. I'd definitely recommend this book, although I must say that I found the translator's notes prefacing every single story to be almost completely unnecessary. I'l [...]

    6. A potent bunch of stories come together to give a funny view on things: sometimes insightful, and sometimes just another thing to laugh about.

    7. Some good ones - Memories, The Sound of Hammering - though most of these are lost on me through heavy references to old Japanese folklore that I know nothing about.

    8. I love Dazai's writing and am determined to read everything I can possibly get my hands on. There was just so much fun in this volume, seeing a livelier more comedic (albeit still dark since this is Dazai) side to Dazai's writing as opposed to his more well known works which tend to lean more towards the tragic and dark. Of course none of these eleven stories would truly be Dazai's without his satire and exploration into - and mockery of - the human condition with just a pinch of nihilism and tr [...]

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