- By Marc Hauser

Mentes Salvajes

  • Title: Mentes Salvajes
  • Author: Marc Hauser
  • ISBN: 9788475779119
  • Page: 412
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Mentes Salvajes What s that squirrel thinking as it runs across the street Behavioral neuroscientist Marc D Hauser asks big questions about little brains in Wild Minds What Animals Really Think While his subjects are

    What s that squirrel thinking as it runs across the street Behavioral neuroscientist Marc D Hauser asks big questions about little brains in Wild Minds What Animals Really Think While his subjects aren t accessible for interviews, he believes that we can gain insight into their interior lives by examining their behavior in the context of their social and physical envirWhat s that squirrel thinking as it runs across the street Behavioral neuroscientist Marc D Hauser asks big questions about little brains in Wild Minds What Animals Really Think While his subjects aren t accessible for interviews, he believes that we can gain insight into their interior lives by examining their behavior in the context of their social and physical environments Thus, while comparing the actions of chimps, rats, honeybees, and human infants, he is careful to keep in mind that each of them has different needs that require different kinds of intelligence and emotion and ought not be judged by the same criteria Looking at counting, mapmaking, self understanding, deception, and other intelligent activities, Hauser shows that the birds and the bees have on their minds than we ve come to believe Acknowledging the vast gulf of language that separates our species from all others, he still maintains that this tool is but one of many and is no better an indication of superior intelligence than is the bat s fantastically well developed echolocation system In the last chapter, Hauser looks at moral behavior and decides that animals can be moral patients but not moral agents that is, their inability to attribute mental states to others keeps them blameless for their actions but their sensitivity to suffering earns them fair treatment from the rest of us Whether or not you agree with that, you re sure to find Wild Minds a refreshing look at the thoughts of our mute cousins Rob Lightner

    1 thought on “Mentes Salvajes

    1. Marc Hauser examines cognitive abilities of animals and their moral sense. He claims that some of the tools for thinking are universal, shared by all animals and humans. The universal toolkit provides animals with a basic capacity to recognize objects, count and navigate. According to Hauser, animals are not equipped with language, self awareness, higher emotions or moral instincts. Whereas by and large I find his conclusions sound, I am somewhat disappointed by the narrowness of the interpretat [...]

    2. This book is about how animals think and feel. Marc Hauser writes in his prologue that all animals come with a basic tool kit for understanding their world, including human beings. These tool kits can also be called instincts. The tools in the kit were gained from evolution, where animals had to meet certain challenges that their environment posed as a problem for them to solve.Chapter one discusses the uses and misuses of single observations. To base one’s theory on a single case is bad scien [...]

    3. This book embodies everything that I loathe about cognitive science, a field that I would adore if people were smarter and technology were at a point where we could study the brain in a more meaningful way. As it stands, we're torn between the meticulous logic of the observations we can do and grand assumptions about the workings of the whole, with a whole mess of half-assed conjecture and pseudoscience in between. I want to be a cognitive scientist 200 years from now, but in the present the fie [...]

    4. Everyone should read this book. The low rating is due to having previously encountered much of the information making it a less engaging read than I would have liked. Also, there were sections that could have been explained in a clearer manner.Contrary to the title the main focus of the text is looking at what we have learned about animal thought processes over the years and the experimental methodology that was involved in such investigations. Far from assuming we know much about animal minds H [...]

    5. Hauser (Harvard Biology prof) is trying to determine whether or not various animals have a "theory of mind" and thus can think morally. He suspects they don't and can't, but is open to further experiments by himself and others. He thinks that part of the problem is so-called Kuhnian perserverance (named after a well-know philosopher who has discussed paradigm shifts in science - we will be reading his book in our science group at the end of 2011;-), in which animals, like humans, "have the great [...]

    6. Probably a bit outdated by now. I like the methodology and the reasoning about the methods employed

    7. Surprise, surprise, this book will not tell you what animals really think. In fact, it won't tell you much of anything except that the author is so arrogant that only he could possible find the right middle line in understanding animal cognition. Mostly, I didn't like this book because I gained nothing from it and it was horribly written. I'm surprised I finished it. He does bring up some experiments, but they are mostly ones I've heard of in other places and I don't feel like he explained them [...]

    8. How disappointing! I couldn't finish this book. This 'scientist' was so biased and one sided about everything animal I doubt he would recognize true emotion in an animal if it stared him in the face. I had worked in close contact with animals for 10 years and also have had the pleasure of living with many four legged companions in my 32 years. I have witnessed many dogs cry from pain, and not the wimpering, but actual tears. I have seen a guinea pig grunt with pure pleasure when a cat played wit [...]

    9. Marc Hauser's acutely delineated breakdown of the tools of perception - as well as his use of dozens of individual experiments and observations, by teams he participated with and those made by others - builds an impressive report on what we know about animal psychology, and also provides at least as many questions for where research needs to go from here. Hauser is a capable writer and does a good job of synthesizing the pure research with the philosophical background and ramifications of it. Ho [...]

    10. I love Hauser's scientific take on animal intelligence studies. He doesn't seem to fall either into the trap of anthropomorphism through anecdote or excessive scepticism, instead focussing on what studies have told us about the specific intellectual and emotional capacities of animals. He considers potential alternative explanations of observed data and explores what would be necessary to choose between these. Although I found it a little dry at times, I thought this was a great overview of the [...]

    11. By describing many experiments on animals and children, Marc Hauser takes us on a journey through the animal (and child) mind. The strong point is that the experiments are described briefly and the questions answered and raised by the experiment are described in more detail. One experiment leads to the next getting you more and more involved in the subject.In the end, it leaves you with more questions than answers. But that's the way I like it.

    12. Good and thought-provoking, but possibly not a book for the casual reader. I had to work to recall some of the terminology he uses that I (probably) learned back as an undergrad. More philosophical than I was expecting. His analyses are fairly complete, and he's careful to state what he/the field doesn't yet know and what is based on just a few experiments that haven't been replicated. Glad I read it, but I probably won't read it again.

    13. Its pretty interesting but all of the evolution trash talk wasn't necessary. The things people have learned about how animals think are not affected in the least by whether or not they believe those animals developed from other animals. Still, a very interesting book. I enjoyed it.

    14. I found this extremely dense reading, but I guess this isn't my field. The author used excellent examples to explain his ideas.

    15. A good book, covers several topics on animal behaviour and the minds of animals. For example if they have self awareness. Very interesting!

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