- By Nick Earls

48 Shades Of Brown

  • Title: 48 Shades Of Brown
  • Author: Nick Earls
  • ISBN: 9780140287691
  • Page: 487
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Shades Of Brown Australian teenager Dan Bancroft had a choice to make go to Geneva with his parents for a year or move into a house with his bass playing aunt Jacq and her friend Naomi He chose Jacq s place and his

    Australian teenager Dan Bancroft had a choice to make go to Geneva with his parents for a year, or move into a house with his bass playing aunt Jacq and her friend Naomi He chose Jacq s place, and his life will never be the same This action packed and laugh out loud funny novel navigates Dan s chaotic world of calculus, roommates, birds, and love.

    1 thought on “48 Shades Of Brown

    1. i really liked the way Nick Earls wrote this book. sometimes it feels a little rambly, but it's basically written so freely from the main character's point of view that you're literally in dan's head. i really liked seeing the way dan thinks, even the way his thoughts drift off on completely different tangents. unfortunately, the book starts off really slow and kinda progresses that way throughout the first half of the book. this is both annoying but a strength of the story, while it sets the sc [...]

    2. 48 Shades of Brown was the 2000 winner of the Children's Book Council of Australia Book of the Year Award for Older Readers (phew - that's a mouthful). And, in many ways it was, perhaps, a fairly significant winner, in that it was one of the handful of Australian 'Young Adult' books released around that time which really pushed the boundaries of what was regarded as effective and suitable 'YA' fiction, and which opened the way for a lot of other Australian writers to really start to play with th [...]

    3. Purchased at Perth Writers' Festival after session with Earls, John Birmingham and Stephen Scourfield talking about "Bromance". Earls was incredibly funny, very self-deprecting and human, but a really talented talker.------------Okay, I read about half of the book but then gave up. I realise that what I purchased is a YA novel, but so also are the John Marsden books. Whilst I just love the Marsden Tomorrow series, Nick's book simply didn't do it for me. Perhaps the difference lies in the narrato [...]

    4. this is a random pick from when i was weeding the teen fiction. this book is ten years old, has a weird cover (sorry, but those sandals freak me out), is falling to bits, and has amazing circ stats at my library. i wanted to know why, so i checked it out. after reading it, i'm not really sure why. it was enjoyable, but the anxious narrator rambles on quite a bit and the funny parts weren't quite my sense of humor. i think earls is pretty good at getting into the brain of an anxious kid, but some [...]

    5. A book I wish I had read before i graduated high school. I thought it was laugh out loud funny and rather accurate in its portrayal of a teenage boy in Australia growing up and learning some of the facts of life.Earls uses some terrific toilet humour, there are vomit jokes, cringeworthy dating tips and even a dog called Boner.He doesn't shy away from the awkward parts and for that reason it kept me reading. Also highly recommended for anyone who lives in a share house.

    6. Loved this book! Great Brisbane setting and the character and all his teenage adventures are entertaining and in parts hilarious.

    7. It was intended to be funny, but the humor didn't do much for me. So without that it was just kind of a middle of the road read with nothing super interesting. I found the characters mildly annoying, but not enough that it ruined the book. So all in all, pretty fine. I probably won't remember this in a month, but it wasn't a bad read. Probably more suited to someone with a different kind of humor than me who doesn't mind reading 250 pages about a lovesick sixteen year old boy.

    8. Hilarious and well worth reading for young adults. I still quote, "friction burns" to my friends 6 years on.

    9. Title: 48 Shades of BrownAuthor: Nick EarlsPublisher: Penguin BooksThis book, written for the young adult market, is two hundred and ninety eight pages of sobering hilarity, the caption on the front cover sums this up aptly. ‘An hilarious and bittersweet story about breaking free, finding your feet, falling in love, and strange birds.’ Having had the opportunity to meet Nick and hear him speak there is no doubt that the characters carry his voice. Indeed you can virtually listen to the tale [...]

    10. This book, written for the young adult market, is two hundred and ninety eight pages of sobering hilarity, the caption on the front cover sums this up aptly. ‘An hilarious and bittersweet story about breaking free, finding your feet, falling in love, and strange birds.’ Having had the opportunity to meet Nick and hear him speak there is no doubt that the characters carry his voice. Indeed you can virtually listen to the tale as the words flit before your eyes.Dan, the central character is ca [...]

    11. Reviewed by Andrew S. Cohen for TeensReadTooIn 48 SHADES OF BROWN, Australian author Nick Earls comically portrays Dan in this coming-of-age story. Dan, a high school student, boards with his crazy band-playing Aunt Jacq, 22, and her roommate, Naomi, an attractive pysch major at the Uni. Through his social and emotional innocence, Dan becomes infatuated with Naomi and her every movement, including her frequent sexual run-ins with her 'jerk' boyfriend, in turn devastating Dan. Dan is very innocen [...]

    12. This is my first book from the Oceania continent as part of my read around the world challenge. The plot follows 17 year old Dan who leaves his normal life behind to go to Australia to stay with his Aunt. It revolves around him getting to grips of living down-under and includes the predicaments and challenges Dan faces along his way. Some key plot points in the book include:- Dan's first encounter of Aunt Jacqueline at the airport. - Dan meeting Naomi and falling in love with her.- The house par [...]

    13. Nick Earls has a good sense of how teen romance works, or doesn 19t work. Dan lucks into a dreamworld 13 senior year of high school away from the parents, sharing a Brisbane home with two women. One of the women is his early-20s aunt Jacq. The other, the 1Cflaxen-haired goddess 1D Naomi, is a very convenient target of Dan 19s hormonal overdrive. He builds elaborate plans worthy of the Most Interesting Man in the World, in his more pimply teenage years. He blends a crunchy batch of dirt pesto, an [...]

    14. Nick Earls has a good sense of how teen romance works, or doesn’t work. Dan lucks into a dreamworld – senior year of high school away from the parents, sharing a Brisbane home with two women. One of the women is his early-20s aunt Jacq. The other, the “flaxen-haired goddess” Naomi, is a very convenient target of Dan’s hormonal overdrive. He builds elaborate plans worthy of the Most Interesting Man in the World, in his more pimply teenage years. He blends a crunchy batch of dirt pesto, [...]

    15. Dan Bancroft is growing up. Not growing tall, but becoming mature about how the "real" world works. And is finding out how complicated women are. Dan is quickly faced with the reality that there is more to life than what's inside the protective circle his parents have built around his home and school. When his parents decide to move to Geneva, Switzerland without him (his choice), he becomes roommates with his very young aunt, Jacq, and her friend Naomi. Dan's last year in school starts out with [...]

    16. This book is not to be confused with any 5o shades of anything. Nick Earls writes a great coming of age story about Dan. Dan's parents have taken an opportunity to work overseas during Dan's VCE year (year 12) and he is to stay with his aunty who is not much older than him. He joins into this uni shared house with another uni girl Naomi who is only one year older than him. Unsure of how to relate with females and what may interest them, he finds himself researching a number of odd things to help [...]

    17. I've heard a lot about Nick Earls, and it was this as well as the fact the book had an Australian actor I've admired for ages for playing quirky, relatable teenage actors on the cover that I chose to take it off the shelf. And the book didn't disappoint. "48 Shades of Brown" was quirky, funny (hilarious, really), crazy, relatable and incredibly, incredibly insightful. I loved the relaxed laziness of the story which is so typical of Brisbane and most of all I loved this boy's honest commentary ab [...]

    18. So after reading a lot of American teen novels it was nice to read something that was closer to home and how closer to home can you get than Brisbane. Nick Earls writes a good, realistic story about a boy who is beginning to experience independence while living with his 22 year old aunt and her house mate (is love in the air?) while his parents are in Geneva. I think it's one of the rare books where the movie might be better. Although the book only contains nine chapters, they are veryHUGEchapte [...]

    19. A few months ago, a friend and I were drunkenly discussing our all-time favorite books and 48 Shades of Brown has been on my list probably since I was about 14, but I realized I couldn't even remember what it was about. So we decided the best solution to this problem was to order it on and read it to find out if it actually deserved a place on my favorite book list. We started reading it together, but between end of the year busyness and more drinking, we only made it through the first 40 pages [...]

    20. I was recommended this book as a humorous story, and the title intrigued others who saw me reading it. It's an Australian story about finding your feet, growing up and moving from the world of a family to a flat. I didn't laugh until close to the end when I chuckled three times. The writing style - using italics to highlight the speech of another and upright for the central character, can be very confusing where the scene also need to be described. The technology is dated too as it was written i [...]

    21. In Nick Earls 48 Shades of Brown, the reader is introduced to such themes as development of an identity, adolescence alienation, sexuality, and masculinity through the main character, Dan Brown. Dan is seventeen and facing a year living with his young Aunt Jacq whilst his parents work overseas. During this time, Dan develops a crush on Jacq’s housemate, Naomi; learns how to drink beer and chat up girls; discovers his Aunt is homosexual, and struggles with finding who he really is. Earls tackle [...]

    22. It's been rather funny in small parts but I'm finding it hard to continue reading. I feel there's no substance to it; a lack of meaning. Although Earls has captured the average teenage male's mind rather accurately, I find the main character Dan, to simply be irritating. However, this may be due to the fact that my views are prejudiced by my constant involvement with teenagers. Other than that, I enjoy the witty humour and the Brisbane setting. Overall, I felt Dan's story didn't go anywhere.

    23. Picked this up because it was cheap in my local second-hand bookshop and sounded as if it might be fun, and it was. Not something I loved so much I'd push it on all my friends, but very funny in parts, if the painful, humiliation kind of funny at times. I liked Dan, and his absolute cluelessness was often perfectly depicted. Not sure I'll ever see pesto quite the same way again, after his attempt to woo his flatmate with his pesto-producing brilliance.

    24. I was either in my late teens or early 20s when I read this but I really enjoyed it, even though I'm not always huge on books with teenage male protagonists (except for Harry Potter). The story was quite sweet. I liked the portrayal of first experiences in sharehousing and how awkward first loves can be. Would definitely recommend for older teeanagers. The movie adaption is not nearly as good as the book.

    25. After a choice of accompanying his parents or living with his aunt Jacq and her friend Naomi, Dan, after choosing the latter, begins to navigate through his life and situations that of typical teenagers face such as calculus and love. Despite it's slightly slow beginning, this book is full of humour that had me snickering throughout the reading

    26. Pulled this off the YA shelf because the title made me laugh out loud. Couldn't get into it enough to bother finishing. The writing style (specifically, without quotation marks) was off-putting though easy enough to ignore once actually reading, but there was no big conflict I wanted to see resolved. Will probably troll some reviews on here to see how things ended, though.

    27. A fun book for teenagers by one of the emerging Australian teenage lit writers. A fun, thoughtless read that really hones in on the place I call home - Brisbane.I found it enjoyable, and Nick Earls signed my copy himself! I sent him some of my short stories and he really liked them!Oh so happy. :-P

    28. It's not often that I won't finish a book, but ended up just skimming a lot of this. I enjoyed reading something that was set in my hometown in Queensland, so it had the excitement of "Ooh, I know exactly what road he's talking about!!"but I just couldn't get into it. Maybe it did pick up after a meandering first half, as was mentioned in some reviews, but it wasn't for me.

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