- By C.P. Lesley

The Vermilion Bird (Legends of the Five Directions, #4)

  • Title: The Vermilion Bird (Legends of the Five Directions, #4)
  • Author: C.P. Lesley
  • ISBN: 9781947044104
  • Page: 154
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Vermilion Bird Legends of the Five Directions Maria Koshkina has spent most of the last three years wishing herself out of her in laws household So she should feel relieved now that her father has found a new match for her Alas he has picked the

    Maria Koshkina has spent most of the last three years wishing herself out of her in laws household So she should feel relieved now that her father has found a new match for her Alas, he has picked the most annoying man in creation not even a Russian, but a Tatar sultan who takes it for granted that she will ride at his side, read what he gives her, and advise him on theMaria Koshkina has spent most of the last three years wishing herself out of her in laws household So she should feel relieved now that her father has found a new match for her Alas, he has picked the most annoying man in creation not even a Russian, but a Tatar sultan who takes it for granted that she will ride at his side, read what he gives her, and advise him on the ins and outs of the Moscow court And where her first husband had minimal interest in women or at least in Maria the new one has a healthy respect for the joys of marriage and no qualms whatsoever about seeking them outside it.Her husband can t decide quite what to make of this beautiful redhead who seems both untouched and touchy Doesn t she understand that a princess needs than embroidery to survive In the assassination filled politics of the sixteenth century Russian court, this unlikely pair struggles to find a way to get along before the undercurrents of rebellion sweep them away.

    1 thought on “The Vermilion Bird (Legends of the Five Directions, #4)

    1. An excellent and entertaining addition to CP Lesley's 16th century Russian series, Legends of the Five Directions. I was really looking forward to The Vermilion Bird as I have read and loved the first three in this series, which I have also reviewed: The Golden Lynx, The Winged Horse and The Swan Princess.Once again, the author brings to life 16th century Russian court and politics through the unlikely couple of the scheming and snappy Maria Koshkina and her Tatar sultan husband. A seemingly mis [...]

    2. ‘Scratch a Russian and you will find a Tatar,’ Napoleon once said, which is exactly what C.P. Lesley demonstrates in her series of novels, Legends of the Five Directions. Despite having studied Russian history, I did not realise the truth of this statement – until I read the fourth part of the series. The Vermilion Bird takes place during the early 16th century when the Tatar influence from the Golden Horde was very strong and the young Ivan IV was waiting in the wings to transform into Iv [...]

    3. Romantic complications, court intrigues, and some cozy colorful scenes of domesticity in 16th century Russia round out C.P. Lesley’s newest book in the Legends of the Five Directions series. This time, we learn more about the difficult Maria’s inner life, and develop sympathy for the way her limited experiences formed her judgmental and critical character. Married off to a dashing Tatar as part of her father’s continuing struggle to maneuver his family into an advantageous position, Maria [...]

    4. Since I am the author, this is not a review but some background information from the Historical Note at the end of the book.In the West the phoenix symbolizes immortality: a bird every so often consumed by fire only to rise from its own ashes. But along the Silk Roads the phoenix, which bears many names and takes many forms, has richer and more complex associations than immortality alone. From the Indian Garuda to Fenghuang of China, Kumai, Huma, Firebird, and the other variations of the Turkic, [...]

    5. An excellent and entertaining addition to CP Lesley’s 16th century Russian historical series, Legends of the Five Directions. I was really looking forward to The Vermilion Bird as I have read and loved the first three in this series, which I have also reviewed: The Golden Lynx, The Winged Horse and The Swan Princess.Once again, the author brings to life 16th century Russian court and politics through the unlikely couple of the scheming and snappy Maria Koshkina and her Tatar sultan husband. A [...]

    6. Since I am the author, this is not a review but some background information from the Historical Note at the end of the book.In the West the phoenix symbolizes immortality: a bird every so often consumed by fire only to rise from its own ashes. But along the Silk Roads the phoenix, which bears many names and takes many forms, has richer and more complex associations than immortality alone. From the Indian Garuda to Fenghuang of China, Kumai, Huma, Firebird, and the other variations of the Turkic, [...]

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