- By Andrea Barnet

All-Night Party: The Women of Bohemian Greenwich Village and Harlem, 1913-1930

  • Title: All-Night Party: The Women of Bohemian Greenwich Village and Harlem, 1913-1930
  • Author: Andrea Barnet
  • ISBN: 9781565123816
  • Page: 425
  • Format: Paperback
  • All Night Party The Women of Bohemian Greenwich Village and Harlem The ladies were smart Sassy Daring Exotic Eclectic Sexy And influential One could call them the first divas and they ran absolutely wild Poets actresses singers artists journalists publishers ba

    The ladies were smart Sassy Daring Exotic Eclectic Sexy And influential One could call them the first divas and they ran absolutely wild Poets, actresses, singers, artists, journalists, publishers, baronesses, and benefactresses, they were thinkers and drinkers They eschewed the social conventions expected of them to be wives and mothers and decided to live onThe ladies were smart Sassy Daring Exotic Eclectic Sexy And influential One could call them the first divas and they ran absolutely wild Poets, actresses, singers, artists, journalists, publishers, baronesses, and benefactresses, they were thinkers and drinkers They eschewed the social conventions expected of them to be wives and mothers and decided to live on their own terms In the process, they became the voices of a new, fierce feminine spirit.There s Mina Loy, a modernist poet and much photographed beauty who traveled in pivotal international art circles blues divas Bessie Smith and Ethel Waters Edna St Vincent Millay, the lyric poet who, with her earthy charm and passion, embodied the 20s ideal of sexual daring the avant garde publishers Margaret Anderson and Jane Heap and the wealthy hostesses of the salons, A Lelia Walker and Mabel Dodge Among the supporting cast are Emma Goldman, Isadora Duncan, Ma Rainey, Margaret Sanger, and Gertrude Stein.Andrea Barnet s fascinating accounts of the emotional and artistic lives of these women together with rare black and white photographs, taken by photographers such as Berenice Abbott and Man Ray capture the women in all their glory This is a history of the early feminists who didn t set out to be feminists, a celebration of the rebellious women who paved the way for future generations.

    1 thought on “All-Night Party: The Women of Bohemian Greenwich Village and Harlem, 1913-1930

    1. I'm listening to music from the pop-jazz singer Ethel Waters, and the blues great Bessie Smith as I'm writing. They are two of the creative women featured in this book about bohemian New York, 1913-1930. Others were the poet and artist Mina Loy, the avant-garde publishers Margaret Anderson and Jane Heap, the poet Edna St Vincent Millay, the wealthy hostesses Mabel Dodge and A'Lelia Walker and their salons, and their artistic friends.After the Great War, Victorian times were left behind as people [...]

    2. A disappointment -- good choice of women to profile, but little depth in the writing and very little analysis.

    3. They were thinkers and they were drinkers, says author Barnet. They ignored the social conventions expected of them - to become wives and mums - and chose to live on their own terms. "They blasted the door open to the rest of the 20thC." Victorian morality was the oppressor. By 1916, "going public with one's animal nature" was the vogue, often at great personal cost. With the 1919 enactment of Prohibition, the forbidden - thanks to religio Americans - had glamour.An amiable survey of some unique [...]

    4. Primarily discusses the artist/poet Mina Loy, publishers Margaret Anderson and Jane Heap, poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, hostesses Mabel Dodge and A'Lelia Walker, and the singers Bessie Smith and Ethel Waters. It also brings in a number of artists, singers and writers in their periphery. Also the men in their lives. Kind of gossipy. Doesn't appear to be any original research but a compilation of what others have written. But well documented. And a decent bibliography leading to other books about [...]

    5. At the dawn of the 20th century a group of people arose to challenge the public thinking on poetry, art, literature and musicll them Futurists or Bohemians, they made a difference to the arts in the years to come. This book concentrates on six women who were a leading force in the movement in both Greenwich Village and Harlem from 1913-1930. Some went on to fame and long careers while others are almost unknown todayThe lived their lives on their own terms and public opinion be damned. They were [...]

    6. Very interesting book about creative women of the 1920's. The sub-title is "the Women of. Bohemian Geenwich Village and Harlem. It led me to look for other books about the women described. I was a little put-off by the fact that the Black women were ALL talked about at the end of the book. Really!?! I'm a 70 year old White woman and have nothing to do with the publishing business and even i know that that is not good editing of material and might be offensive to some readers. I couldn't see any [...]

    7. Written by my sister so yes, 5 stars. Each chapter focuses on different women from this time period, Edna Vincent Millay, Mina Loy, and Bessie Smith to name a few. Well written and easy to read.

    8. There is not very much analysis in All-Night Party, which is really a shame, especially given the women she chose to focus on: the hostesses are fairly obscure, and Mina Loy is probably not as popular as she was, but Edna St. Vincent Millay, Bessie Smith, and Ethel Waters are all well-known artists. My favorite chapter was the one which discussed Jane Heap and Margaret Anderson, who are much more obscure and therefore more interesting. I am a big fan of Millay, but one chapter in a group biograp [...]

    9. Interesting glimpse into the lives of several women who were contemporaries during the Progressive Era. I'm chagrined to admit I'd never heard of most of them, the exceptions being Edna Millay, Bessie Smith, Margaret Anderson and Jane Heap.It makes me think of social progress from a different perspective; it seems not to be a steady push forward, but we advance in great waves and heaves.

    10. The biographies are somewhat incomplete. You can definitely find better information elsewhere on some of the women included in this book. However, as a whole it's worth reading as a portrait of the era. It's a great starting point if you're interested in any of the subjects.

    11. I skimmed this book in one sitting on the train to prepare for a "React to the Past" workshop that will cover this era. I'll definitely go back and reread it againfascinating women in a fascinating era. I had no idea.

    12. I skimmed most of the book but did read the sections about Bessie Smith and Ethel Waters, both of whom had much more difficult lives than the white bohemians in Greenwich Village. Interesting.

    13. The women Barnet includes in this look at the early 20th-century Boho set are fascinating: Edna St. Millay, Mina Loy, Bessie Smith, among others. They led wild, excessive lives in the pursuit of art and the New Woman. They took part in salons, started their own literary journals, declared themselves futurists and modernists, fostered addictions, slept with whomever they liked, and generally scandalized the rest of post-Victorian America.While there stories are all very interesting, much of the b [...]

    14. kind of poorly written, but still worth it to find out the stories of these cool ladies. Skip the St. Vincent Millay chapter, though, and just read her bio

    15. This book is helping me research for my silent film actress character in Two Augusts in a Row in a Row.

    16. For years, I’ve avoided more modern history. This book let me know just how much I’ve been missing. In vibrant, yet accessible language, Andrea Barnet paints pictures of Mina Loy, Margaret Anderson, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Mabel Dodge. A’Lelia Walker, Bessie Smith and Ethel Waters. She brings to life their connections with Greenwich Village and Harlem, along with the times they existed. She shows the impact these individuals had on them, exploding like fireworks which shook rigid systems [...]

    17. This was, like, the Contiki tour of Bohemian Greenwich Village and Harlem—a bit of a whirlwind, lots of booze, and generally a good way to figure out what subjects I want to go back and revisit. One thing I kept coming back to again and again in reading these profiles: all of these women made tremendous art, but seemingly at great cost to their mental or physical well-being and relationships. So many of them lived their lives relying on the crutches of alcohol or sex or food and ended their li [...]

    18. I enjoyed it it was a very easy read and very light. Just a teaser. This might be a book for ppl that know nothing about these woman but if you've read and studied this period this isn't the book for you too light

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *