- By Byron Reeves Clifford Nass

The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television, and New Media Like Real People and Places

  • Title: The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television, and New Media Like Real People and Places
  • Author: Byron Reeves Clifford Nass
  • ISBN: 9781575860534
  • Page: 317
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Media Equation How People Treat Computers Television and New Media Like Real People and Places Can human beings relate to computer or television programs in the same way they relate to other human beings Based on numerous psychological studies this book concludes that people not only can but d

    Can human beings relate to computer or television programs in the same way they relate to other human beings Based on numerous psychological studies, this book concludes that people not only can but do treat computers, televisions, and new media as real people and places Studies demonstrate that people are polite to computers that they treat computers with female voicCan human beings relate to computer or television programs in the same way they relate to other human beings Based on numerous psychological studies, this book concludes that people not only can but do treat computers, televisions, and new media as real people and places Studies demonstrate that people are polite to computers that they treat computers with female voices differently than male ones that large faces on a screen can invade our personal space and that on screen and real life motion can provoke the same physical responses Using everyday language to engage readers interested in psychology, communication, and computer technology, Reeves and Nass detail how this knowledge can help in designing a wide range of media.

    1 thought on “The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television, and New Media Like Real People and Places

    1. The concept of this book is a simple question: Media = Reality? As the title describes, these researchers set out to examine whether computers, televisions, and other media follow the same social and natural rules as humans. The findings were interesting, such as how a masculine voice from a computer is responded to in the same way as a masculine voice coming from a human, or how people respond to visual stimuli on a computer screen similarly to if the object were really present.When I had this [...]

    2. Very nice book that shows we treat media and computer interfaces as real people. That we do this automatically even if we know it is fiction.

    3. This marvelous little academic book describes the results of studies the authors did that determined -- wait for it -- that people treat computers, TV and other electronic media as if they were human. In other words, we're polite to computers when we address them directly, and less polite when we're talking about them behind their backs. The whole idea seems obvious when you think about it for more than 5 minutes, but I'm sure it didn't when the authors set out to study the matter, and anyway th [...]

    4. Interesting material, but repetitive and mind-numbing presentation. Basically, each chapter follows the same structure - question, equivalent social psych experiment, our experiment design, results and discussion. The bottom line is yes, people do treat media like they do people, probably because our brain is only evolved to deal with other living beings and therefore treat everything like living beings. However, some of the experiments are strange, and would be hard to find corollaries in real [...]

    5. People know computers are not social beings, and say they know. Still, experiments show they treat computers (and other media like movies) as if they were real social beings. This book does a good job of describing their hypotheses clearly (e.g "People will believe that they did better on a task when they are flattered by a computer than when the computer doesn't give any evaluation."), and the experiments they conducted to test the hypotheses.

    6. Potentially more useful to the proverbial Martian anthropologist, the interesting bits of this study were found among unfortunately increasingly dull case studies. Nevertheless this is an important topic and the authors explore it fairly comprehensively.

    7. Really cool insights about human brains and how we interpret media. Highly recommended for anyone interested media study and psychology.

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