- By Scott Russell Sanders

A Conservationist Manifesto

  • Title: A Conservationist Manifesto
  • Author: Scott Russell Sanders
  • ISBN: 9780253220806
  • Page: 161
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Conservationist Manifesto As an antidote to the destructive culture of consumption dominating American life today Scott Russell Sanders calls for a culture of conservation that allows us to savor and preserve the world inste

    As an antidote to the destructive culture of consumption dominating American life today, Scott Russell Sanders calls for a culture of conservation that allows us to savor and preserve the world, instead of devouring it How might we shift to a durable and responsible way of life What changes in values and behavior will be required Ranging geographically from southerAs an antidote to the destructive culture of consumption dominating American life today, Scott Russell Sanders calls for a culture of conservation that allows us to savor and preserve the world, instead of devouring it How might we shift to a durable and responsible way of life What changes in values and behavior will be required Ranging geographically from southern Indiana to the Boundary Waters Wilderness and culturally from the Bible to billboards, Sanders extends the visions of Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and Rachel Carson to our own day A Conservationist Manifesto shows the crucial relevance of a conservation ethic at a time of mounting concern about global climate change, depletion of natural resources, extinction of species, and the economic inequities between rich and poor nations The important message of this powerful book is that conservation is not simply a personal virtue but a public one.

    1 thought on “A Conservationist Manifesto

    1. This semester I'm taking "Environmentalism and Sustainability Studies 101" (no, really) to fulfill a science credit. Before this class, I thought I liked the earth. I thought I was fairly environmentally friendly. Apparently, I had no frickin idea just how nuts you have to be to consider yourself Earth-friendly. Take Mr. Sanders, for example. When he's not railing against the media being responsible for everything wrong with the planet (see, consumerism makes people only think about themselves - [...]

    2. While Sanders offers some captivating insight into environmental issues and offers some viable proposals for conservation (some not so much), the overall feel of the book is pretentious. The man wrote it in his garden cabin/hut he had built to "get more in tune with nature." How can you write a book about conservation from an unnecessary building that used raw materials? Come on.

    3. "Whatever else we teach our children, we owe them an ecological education () By the time they finish school, children who have received an ecological education know in their bones that the wellbeing of people depends on the wellbeing of Earth, from the neighborhood to the watershed to the planet". The practice of conservation is both an individual and collective, societal matter. It is a personal and a public virtue, one that will seal our fate - no less. ‘A Conservationist Manifesto’ remind [...]

    4. Sanders's writing style is the stuff that legends are made of: smooth, clear, vivid, spare. The essays in this collection are uneven, though. From the naïveté of "The Warehouse and the Wilderness," a prolonged rant against postmodern literary theory, a subject about which Sanders admits he knows very little, to the brilliance of "Stillness," a tight essay structured by his first visit to a private cabin on a piece of property he owns. My favorite piece was "Simplicity and Sanity," which offere [...]

    5. I heard Sanders speak at a library re-dedication and searched for his work. I really did not want to read another ecology manifesto --- but this one is different. He creates a hopeful world view in the midst of the potential disaster that will come unless we get a grip on our consumerism and overuse of the worlds gifts which we quickly trash!His writing is almost poetic and his use of both metaphor and etymology is both beautiful and helpful in understanding the concepts he promotes. Along with [...]

    6. This collection of essays inspires me to seek out the many other quality nature writers our country has been blessed with over the last one hundred and fifty years or so. Sanders makes it clear that these voices, whether still living (Wendell Berry, to name one) or long dead (Thoreau and Emerson), offer us observations crucial to repairing our current relationship with the earth. In addition to holding this responsible and humble view in common, these writers (and Sanders belongs in this group a [...]

    7. Sanders is one of those writers who ought to be much better known than he is. This book collects several of his previously published essays, all of them centered in some way around the satisfactions that come from living simply and lightly upon the land. I especially liked his reflections on the meaning of words such as "commonwealth" (hint: not about money) and his thought-provoking suggestion about using the Sabbath as an occasion to give the earth a rest from us. This is also a beautifully pa [...]

    8. This is one of the best books I've read lately. Sanders' call to move from a culture of consumption to one of conservation is more timely than ever now in the wake of our uncertain financial future, depleting oil supply, and global climate change. This book makes me think twice about my actions as they not only affect me, but also the planet and everyone else who lives on it. I am better for reading it, and hopefully this positive impact will be felt by the Earth as well. I can't recommend this [...]

    9. Scott Russell Sanders is an inspiration! I heard him do a reading recently and was able to have lunch with him--a joy! I am not too far into this book yet, but it raises great questions/thoughts! Also, his compelation of short stories "Wilderness Plots" is amazing and I highly recommend it too!

    10. What a wonderful, caring, simple (in a good way) book. Feels a little like dadsplaining sometimes, but I still enjoyed it thoroughly!

    11. Decent essays. Well written. Not much new under the sun, however. These essays retread familiar eco-themes.

    12. Some well written points, but comes across too preachy (this from an environmental advocate) and seems to ignore certain realities of our modern society.

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