- By Ella Cheever Thayer

Wired Love: A Romance of Dots and Dashes

  • Title: Wired Love: A Romance of Dots and Dashes
  • Author: Ella Cheever Thayer
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 326
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Wired Love A Romance of Dots and Dashes This book published in mulls what how authentic a romance can be that is mediated over the wire by two telegraph operators An excerpt from the book But a very significant noise to Miss Nathalie R

    This book published in 1879 mulls what how authentic a romance can be that is mediated over the wire by two telegraph operators.An excerpt from the book But a very significant noise to Miss Nathalie Rogers, or Nattie, as she was usually abbreviated a noise that caused her to lay aside her book,and jump up hastily, exclaiming, with a gesture of impatience Somebody alwayThis book published in 1879 mulls what how authentic a romance can be that is mediated over the wire by two telegraph operators.An excerpt from the book But a very significant noise to Miss Nathalie Rogers, or Nattie, as she was usually abbreviated a noise that caused her to lay aside her book,and jump up hastily, exclaiming, with a gesture of impatience Somebody always calls me in the middle of every entertaining chapter For that noise, that little clatter, like, and yet too irregular to be the ticking of a clock, expressed to Nattie these four mystic letters B m X n which same four mystic letters, interpreted, meant that the name, or, to use the technical word, call, of the telegraph office over which she was present sole presiding genius, was B m, and that Bm was wanted by another office on the wire, designated as X n A little, out of the way, country office, some fifty miles down the line, was X n, and, as Nattie signaled in reply to the call her readiness to receive any communications therefrom, she was conscious of holding in some slight contempt the possible abilities of the human portion of its machinery.For who but an operator very green in the profession would stay _there_ Consequently, she was quite unprepared for the velocity with which the telegraph alphabet of sounds in dots and dashes rattled over the instrument, appropriately termed a sounder, upon which messages are received, and found herself wholly unable to write down the words asfast as they came.

    1 thought on “Wired Love: A Romance of Dots and Dashes

    1. bbc/programmes/b099xpwgDescription: Wired Love: A Romance of Dots and Dashes, published in 1879, was a ground breaking book about a long-distance romance conducted over the telegraph wire - aptly termed The Victorian Internet. Written by the previously unknown Ella Cheever Thayer, Wired Love's Manhattan publisher trumpeted it as "a bright little telegraphic novel" that told "the old, old story - in a new, new way". But Thayer's story was grounded in Victorian reality. Men and women alike worked [...]

    2. Ah, telegraphy, the text messages of yesteryear! ;-)I so wanted to love this novel but it fell short of my expectations. I see it has garnered a surprising number of reviews here for what I had assumed was a fairly obscure little novel from the 1879, many more glowing in their praise than mine would be, so I will make mine brief. I really love the premise and feel that it's surprisingly contemporary in our age of internet chat groups, emails, texting and online dating. If you fall for someone "o [...]

    3. Many stories have been told over the years, of couples who meet and correspond without – or before – ever coming face to face. ‘Wired Love’ is a particularly lovely example of that type of story, and – given that it was published in 1879 – a strikingly modern story.Nattie – Miss Nathalie Rogers – was making her own way in the world. She was bright, she was independent, she hoped to become a writer one day; and she had secured a room in a respectable boarding house and employment [...]

    4. Tremendously cute. The type of story in the "Shop Around the Corner" and "You've Got Mail" genre, although this one pre-dates both.Nattie, a young woman who has obtained a post in a telegraph office, is having a particularly bad few minutes. The telegrapher on the other end is sending way too fast for her to decipher, a customer is asking stupid questions, and then she upsets a bottle of ink all over herself. These things cause her to interrupt "C" (the telegrapher on the other end) several time [...]

    5. Ella Thayer was a former telegraph operator who carefully followed the adage "write what you know" for this romantic novel. And thus, in Wired Love, Nattie Rogers is a telegraph operator who strikes up a friendship -- unseen, of course -- with fellow telegraph operator, "C". I had thought this was a Great Independent Discovery of mine, but there are numerous appreciations all over the Internet. This makes sense, because it's jaw-droppingly modern. Replace the telegraph lines with an IRC chatroom [...]

    6. In all honesty, I have to point out that I actually read the scanned version of this book available (for free) for download through . I've long been intrigued by the similarities between our times and the 1880s, and this book points out another connection. It tells the story of an early online romance conducted between telegraph operators. The relationship progresses much as you would expect it to if it were conducted using say, Match, today. Pitfalls are recognizable to anyone who's used an onl [...]

    7. From BBC Radio 4:A Romance of Dots and Dashes, published in 1879, was a ground breaking book about a long-distance romance conducted over the telegraph wire - aptly termed The Victorian Internet. Written by the previously unknown Ella Cheever Thayer, Wired Love's Manhattan publisher trumpeted it as "a bright little telegraphic novel" that told "the old, old story - in a new, new way". But Thayer's story was grounded in Victorian reality. Men and women alike worked as telegraph operators, with pr [...]

    8. I really enjoyed this! Very unexpected. I'm beginning to actually enjoy historical romances.I'm sure if I was reading this during the time it was written my emotions and reactions would have been much stronger.I was enthralled by the sweet pursuit of love. Expressing our interest in someone is so different today.Very refreshing read.

    9. This review also posted on Red Hot Books.Miss Nathalie Rogers, aka Nattie, is a telegraph operator in the 1870s. She is eighteen and lives in a boarding hotel, having left her family so that they won’t have to support her. She is independent, smart, and aspires to be a writer someday, once she finds the time.One day, at work, another telegraph operator some sixty miles away begins to chat with her through Morse code. They begin telling stories, laughing (“the circumstance being conveyed to h [...]

    10. I read this on the strength of Clive Thompson's review Wired Love: A tale of catfishing, OK Cupid, and sexting from 1880; I downloaded & read the version.Thompson summarizes it:Nattie is at work one day when a telegraph operator in another city, who calls himself “C”, begins chatting her up. They engage in a virtual courtship, things get funny and romantic, until suddenly things take a most puzzling and mysterious turn.It’s all quite nuttily modern. Wired Love anticipates everything w [...]

    11. Usually when I review a book from previous centuries, I have to preface it with warnings about the bits that are dated, weird, or offensive to modern sensibilities. No such preamble is needed here.The book is a bit prescient in that it presents that unfolding of a romance between two people who first meet as operators over a telegraph wire. Maybe that's dated again because now when people meet online they often do know what each looks like. Still, the story, including the fascination of the unkn [...]

    12. The version I read was free through the google play store. This was a light, entertaining read. The setting and plot is fun, and it started out pretty well. Almost all of the characters are insufferable though, and every single male character unreasonable. None of them know when to back off, or how to accept 'no' or 'not interested' no matter how many times it is said. I really enjoyed the close friendship formed between Cyn and Nattie, and that their support of each other is prevalent throughou [...]

    13. "We will soon be able to do everything by electricity; who knows but some genius will invent something for the especial use of lovers? something, for instance, to carry in their pockets, so when they are far away from each other, and pine for the sound of 'that beloved voice,' they will have only to take up this electrical apparatus, put it to their ears, and be happy. Ah! blissful lovers of the future!"A nicely-crafted little melodrama. Funny (even 130some years after publication) and moving, w [...]

    14. This was a joyful surprise. I was immediately drawn in by the similarities of the long distance communication via telegraph and today's chat rooms, as well as other comments concerning technology. The author had a wonderful grasp of where technology (cell phones!) was headed. And then the characters grabbed hold of me. The various personalities and the situations they found themselves had me laughing out loud through the grand majority of the book. It was such a fun, light read.

    15. It's just another day in the office when Nattie begins chatting with "C@Xn" over a customer service snafu. Soon enough, conversations with the witty "C" are the highlight of her day — a highlight for which she comes to work early and leaves late. Until the day he suggests that "C" and "N" should meet.Ella Cheever Thayer has written the most topical book of 1999, a charming romcom that combines the cyber-pals of You've Got Mail with the urban-twenty-somethings-living-in-the-same-building of Fri [...]

    16. I need to read a nice little book, a book that did not include chopped-off wrists (The One I Left Behind by Jennifer McMahon, which we read for book group last week) or terrible people who deserve the misery they sow for each other (Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn, also read for book group). This book did the trick.

    17. Gwern aptly described this as "nuttily modern" in his review. Anticipating everything we've come to expect from what goes online: from anonymous internet chat to cellphones (and that too in 1879). All in all a very amusing Victorian romance novel.

    18. A delightful read - a romance written back in 1880! Thanks to the tip that turned me onto this book, available online at Google books. Google is scanning old library books whose copyrights have expired. Love it!

    19. Such a good story! Almost a mixture between You've Got Mail and Emma but funnier than both. Just so cute and sweet and proper. Classic story of love the personality not the being.

    20. A Wired Love: A Romance of Dots and Dashes is a wonderful book written in 1887 that very easily could have been written today. The themes of the book are still so relevant that you would think it was the years best seller. Even though the english its written in is old-style, it isn't hard to comprehend. Ella Cheever Thayer writes a story about cat-fishing and "on-line" romance long before the days of Tinder. It speaks levels to the extent humans will go to find love. Technology has been used for [...]

    21. Thank you to NetGalley and Dover Publications for a digital galley of this novel.First published in the United States in 1890 this novel suffered from an erroneous surmise on my part which just wouldn't go away. I knew there was going to be a romance involved, but I had expected the overall story would revolve more around the telegraph than the love life of the operators. The romances (for there end up being many young people who are more than willing to fall in love) were very basic entanglemen [...]

    22. This is the best romance book I have read in a while. It is so thoroughly fascinating that I couldn't put it down after starting. It feels very modern for a Victorian book that at first I thought it was written nowadays merely emulating the 1800's. The way the book goes on about being a woman, having ambition and facing prejudice is fascinating if we consider the date this was written. Also, going beyond the parallels to modern online dating, which are eerie, the part where the book describes a [...]

    23. A romance about "online" romance in the 1870s, as two telegraph operators fall in love across the wire. Their budding relationship experiences a setback after some pseudo-catfishing, but they find each other by texting at a party. Although the subject matter is antiquated, this novel has a distinctly contemporary feel. The technology is easily translatable to ours, but, most significantly, Thayer's sense of character and wit remain crisp and compassionate. Thayer, a former telegraph operator kno [...]

    24. This story from the late 1800s translates surprisingly well to current reader sensibilities. I enjoyed the twists and turns and the novelty of romance from afar. There were some choices that differ from those that would be made in our times now, but overall the story is worth taking reading. Thank you to the volunteers who made it available electronically.

    25. So much fun! A charming little love story about a telegraph operator who falls in love from afar. More than romance, it focuses on Nattie's outlook and her circle of friends, giving a limited view into her life. Warmly written & engaging—plus funny, even if lots of the story devices are obvious and/or over the top. Makes you realise how much life hasn't changed—or at least, how people haven't.

    26. I've seen a lot of mentions of this book recently - I think this blog post from July 2013 is the one that got the buzz started. Wired Love was published in 1880 and is available for free from Project Gutenberg. It's a short, fluffy book about a woman who becomes infatuated with a person she talks to regularly but has never met - a telegraph operator working at a station about 70 miles away from her own. The buzz about the book in 2013 is, of course, due to the fact that it completely and perfect [...]

    27. I believe this could very well be the first "Internet Romance" novel ever written!!! Published in 1880, it describes the romance between two telegraph operators: Nellie and an operator known only to her as "C". Our heroine is a young woman just gaining her independence and earning her way in a very male dominated field of work. Through a bit of serendipity, our protagonist meets "on the wire", the object of her growing affections,an unseen male operator in a distant town, who she becomes ever mo [...]

    28. Whenever I start to forget that times change but people stay the same, a book like this comes along to remind me how much we have in common with the past. We've all asked ourselves, "How would someone from the 1800s react if you stuck them through a time machine and brought them to today?" Well--Ella Cheever Thayer and her characters would survive this experiment perfectly intact. "Wired Love" is a fresh and modern sounding book, with ambitious go-getting women (Nattie, Cyn) who don't allow them [...]

    29. For all that it was written in 1880, Ella Thayer's "Wired Love" is still remarkably apt today. Two telegraph operators N (Natty) and C (Clem) meet over a wire while sending messages to each other; they flirt and become friends, but without actually meeting, there is no way to prove they are what they say they are - they just have each other's word - and living seventy miles apart, it is unlikely they will meet face-to-face. Via facebook and chat rooms we can meet people and strike up a romance - [...]

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