- By J. Robert King

Heart of Midnight

  • Title: Heart of Midnight
  • Author: J. Robert King
  • ISBN: 9781560763550
  • Page: 280
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Heart of Midnight Revenge The word rings in Casimir s mind He has laid his plans for a decade ten years among the scruffy children the rats and the fleas of an orphanage At last Casimir sets his intricate scheme into

    Revenge The word rings in Casimir s mind He has laid his plans for a decade ten years among the scruffy children, the rats and the fleas of an orphanage At last Casimir sets his intricate scheme into motion, seeking glorious revenge upon the man who slew his mother and made him an orphan.But revenge is a merciless master To slay his nemesis, Casimir summons a dark anRevenge The word rings in Casimir s mind He has laid his plans for a decade ten years among the scruffy children, the rats and the fleas of an orphanage At last Casimir sets his intricate scheme into motion, seeking glorious revenge upon the man who slew his mother and made him an orphan.But revenge is a merciless master To slay his nemesis, Casimir summons a dark and powerful curse And when that terrible curse is summoned, he must confront the greatest foe of allhimself.Heart of Midnight is the fourth in an open ended series of Gothic horror tales dealing with the masters and monsters of the Ravenloft dark fantasy setting.

    1 thought on “Heart of Midnight

    1. The main things I took away from this novel were a look at the nature of lycanthropy in Ravenloft, a overview of the domain of Kartakass, and a good look at the Darklord of that domain. The characters themselves are fairly fogetable and predictable and have little to no development. The plot is fine but would have been served better by either making the novel longer to better flesh out parts or to trim some unnecessary parts and use that space to fill out more important things. ts not bad really [...]

    2. Heart of Midnight by J. Robert King- This is the fourth book that was released in the Ravenloft line of novels based off the Ravenloft setting in the pen and paper roleplaying game Dungeons and Dragons. This is also a stand-alone novel and can be read without any prior knowledge with Ravenloft or Dungeons and Dragons. J. Robert King has written a number of novels in various shared-world and otherwise. He has written another novel that is set in Ravenloft titled Carnival of Fear. He's written two [...]

    3. While I admit this book wasn't incredible, it did a couple of things right that I always want to see from horror and dark fantasy. First, despite a seemingly predictable, there were some interesting twists that kept things interesting. Second, the author wrote so that the reader almost wanted to empathize with the villains, even after it was clear they were villains. To be fair though, this book isn't for everyone. It is a tie-in for Dungeons and Dragons, and for that reason, I would recommend i [...]

    4. El camino al infierno esta pavimentado de buenas intenciones. Esta frase me viene a la mente, ahora que reflexiono en seco la nove titulada: Corazón de Medianoche. Escrita por J. Robert King, por allá por los noventas, perteneciente al Escenario de Campaña de terror-gótico: Ravenloft . Nos narra la historia de un joven llamado Casimir, que desea vengarse del Maestro Cantor de la Ciudad de Armonía. Para llevar a cabo esta hazaña el joven se entregara a fuerzas oscuras, que le darán las her [...]

    5. Better than I thought it would be. Not that I have anything against the author, but just from the cover art and the blurb on the back I was expecting a typical werewolf story (lycanthropes aren't my favorite supernatural horror creatures). I gave it a chance though, and found that there was a lot to this book. It was planned out well and felt longer than it was because of the amount of time that was passing for the characters. Clever, lots of different emotional responses, and it kept me wanting [...]

    6. For a first novel, the prose was actually better than I expected. And the ending was appropriately downbeat, considering the setting. Everything else about the book was frustrating, though. The characters generally unlikable or — at best — frustrating. I've seen a few people say Harkon Lukas was a bright spot — no, he was a drag as well. I won't spoil one of the novel's big twists, but it's worth mentioning that it's both clever and hilariously stupid (I didn't think this was possible 'til [...]

    7. This book has all the elements of a Ravenloft novel, but lacks the intensity to bring them to life. The sense of dread and foreboding does not carry well, the focus being more on the passions of love and anger. While these themes are integral to a story concerning werewolves, more of the focus should have been shifted on the setting, and the sense of fatal inevitability that comes from visiting Ravenloft.

    8. Personally, I enjoyed this book. But then, I've always had a weak spot for werewolves.Although, there is one bit of dialogue that I always cringe at whenever I re-read the story:"You are not a werewolf, a man who changes into a wolf. You, Casimir, are a wolfwere, a wolf who changes into a man."Bah!

    9. Better than many of the other RPG tie-in novels, with a few inventive plot twists and an ending I wasn't expecting given the archetypal Ravenloft protagonist trajectory.

    10. As much as I liked J. Robert King's "Carnival of fear", as much I didn't like "Heart of Midnight". Predictable plot and nothing new or truly thrilling. An easy-reading to read and forget about it.

    11. Dark and brutal. It's a fictional adventure genre, so if that doesn't interest you look else where. About an orphan boy turned man with a unique curse.

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