- By Lao She

Teahouse

  • Title: Teahouse
  • Author: Lao She
  • ISBN: 9789629961251
  • Page: 279
  • Format: Paperback
  • Teahouse Set in an old teahouse in Beijing the play is typical of Lao She s art that seeks to provide a panoramic view of Chinese history and culture in their transformation from tradition to modernity Teahou

    Set in an old teahouse in Beijing, the play is typical of Lao She s art that seeks to provide a panoramic view of Chinese history and culture in their transformation from tradition to modernity Teahouse spans fifty years in modern Chinese history from the collapse of the Qing dynasty and the Republican Revolution to the birth of the People s Republic The play brings togeSet in an old teahouse in Beijing, the play is typical of Lao She s art that seeks to provide a panoramic view of Chinese history and culture in their transformation from tradition to modernity Teahouse spans fifty years in modern Chinese history from the collapse of the Qing dynasty and the Republican Revolution to the birth of the People s Republic The play brings together over sixty characters, representing all walks of life in change It is noted for its vivid portrayal of characters and lively use of Beijing dialect, but its main thrust lies in Lao She s vision of history, which is prophetic of later political movements and its disastrous effects on the average Chinese people Teahouse is a rare masterpiece of the contemporary Chinese theatre It has been performed in Japan, Europe and North America, and translated into major foreign languages.

    1 thought on “Teahouse

    1. I don't know what this translation will be like, but I've read an older translation of this play and it's a really moving and incredible story. You have to know a lot of Chinese history to see where it's coming from and there's a very rich cast involved. But it's moving seeing all the changes and all the interplay between the different parties involved. The three acts take place over different periods of time and shows how different philosophies and beliefs play out over the generations. I'll wr [...]

    2. Wonderful work! I remember when this famous Chinese play “Teahouse” (茶馆) came to town in Singapore in 1986, I enjoyed the play thoroughly and got to know and read up more on Lao She’s work since then. “Teahouse” is one of Lao She's most famous work, it portrayed the struggles of ordinary people, men on the street so to speak; with the words they used, their cares and concerns and sufferings under different political backdrops from the late 1800s, under the weak government of the Qi [...]

    3. Considered to be one of Lao She's best works, "Teahouse" takes a diverse cast of nearly seventy characters and expertly weaves them together to bring to life the story of a tea house as it attempts to whether through the "reforms" of a changing China. Taking place at three different major periods in China's transformation (the collapse of the Quing dynasty in 1898, the failure of the Republican revolution in 1917, and the downfall of the Nationalist Government in 1945) the "Teahouse" welcomes in [...]

    4. A beautiful translation of a beautifully written Chinese satire spanning 50 years in a Beijing Teahouse. Through the proprietor, his family, his loyal customers, and the men seeking profit from the misfortunes of others, Lao She gives a perspective of life in Beijing and the deterioration of society with a humorous twist, however sad.

    5. This is, beyond a doubt, and without exaggeration, one of the best Chinese dramas of all time. The English version is translated by Ying Ruocheng, who played "Pockmark Liu" in the earlier stagings of the play (and the role of Norman Bethune's interpreter in the 1964 biopic "Dr Bethune", and also the head of the war criminals detainment center in "The Last Emperor"). Strongly recommended for those interested in modern Chinese plays. This March the Beijing People's Art Theatre came to my hometown [...]

    6. CHINESE CIVILIZATION IS ONE HUNDRED TIMES OLDER THAN THE WESTOne of the strangest plays we can imagine because it deals with China and for us, westerners, China is the other end of the universe. It has three acts, one in 1898. The second ten years later hence in 1908 or so, and the third one after 1945 but under the Kuomintang government. The scene is in the Teahouse in Beijing all the time. At first we are at the end of the Imperial China with the Empire going out, meaning down, and the Emperor [...]

    7. I don't give it five stars because it is a positive story but with negative meanings. Sometimes I can figure it out, but sometimes I can't see it.

    8. A play that covers almost fifty years of Chinese history. It's all social commentary; character development is not on the menu. Typically a character appears, has a one- or two-minute scene, and then vanishes for the rest of the play. But I felt I learned a lot by reading it.

    9. An interesting story, though the style is a bit difficult for someone who doesn't read many plays and doesn't know much Chinese history. The play tells the story of a Chinese tea house in three acts, with each act covering a different period in Chinese history.

    10. 一邊看視頻,一邊看喜劇,非常能夠欣賞作品。最後一幕特別感動,很有效地帶出了當時無助的一種氣氛。

    11. อ่านฉบับแปลไทยของเจ้าหญิงสิรินธรบทสนทนาของตัวละครสะท้อนภาพในยุคปฏิวัติได้อย่างน่าสนใจ

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