- By JackDavis Wallace Wood Will Elder Harvey Kurtzman John Severin Jerry DeFuccio

The Mad Archives, Vol. 1

  • Title: The Mad Archives, Vol. 1
  • Author: JackDavis Wallace Wood Will Elder Harvey Kurtzman John Severin Jerry DeFuccio
  • ISBN: 9781563898167
  • Page: 192
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Mad Archives Vol Before the existence of pop culture sharpshooter MAD MAGAZINE there was the original MAD as in Tales Calculated to Drive You MAD Twenty three comic book issues that threw the rule book out the window

    Before the existence of pop culture sharpshooter MAD MAGAZINE there was the original MAD as in, Tales Calculated to Drive You MAD Twenty three comic book issues that threw the rule book out the window and redefined comedy and satire for generations to come It s visionary humor in a jugular vein, presented in a handsome hardcover format Here is where it all began.

    1 thought on “The Mad Archives, Vol. 1

    1. “If I had to pick one single comic book that was the best comic book ever, it would be Kurtzman’s Mad.” — Alan Moore."In many ways Harvey was one of the godparents of Monty Python. All the smart people loved Harvey’s work; the dumb people didn’t. It was the same with Python" - Terry Gilliam

    2. Years before Alfred E. Neuman reared his head, Mad (not yet a "Magazine") made its debut in 1952 as the first humorous title in the EC line. The brainchild of editor Harvey Kurtzman, Mad quickly found its voice and became a sensation, surviving the persecution of the comic industry in the mid-50s to become EC's sole publication.This must have been over-the-top, groundbreaking work in the 50s, a breath of relief from the slow, steady, subtle humor of the New Yorker or the staid comic strips of th [...]

    3. Features the first 6 issues of the series. The art and colour look great and the book is pretty solid and seems to be of quality.As far as the content, it's okay. The first couple issues are a bit hit and miss, but once Kurtzman found his footing by issue 3 or 4, it gets dead solid. Which is not to say that here aren't some corny gags in the first few issues that wont make you laugh out loud. It's surprising how will it all holds up, 60 years later. Will Elder and Wally Woood really shine. So li [...]

    4. I knew MAD was old, but I didn't realize how old, nor that it had been publishing continuously. I think it'll be a hoot to see what it was like in the beginning.***Almost disturbingly not funny. The art style is weird, the few women appearing are almost identical, whereas the men who seem to crowd each frame are extreme caricatures with exaggerated features. Seriously, it kind of looks like a scene with the mutants from Futurama. None of the stuff familiar to me from Mad in the 70s (or now) is p [...]

    5. A lot of the humour is dated and corny but the art, from the likes of Wally Wood and Jack Davis, is still inspired. It's hard to imagine the impact MAD must have had when it was first released back in 1952 and the mixture of irreverent satire and outright juvenile silliness remains influential to this day. For what it's worth, the colour reproduction in these archive volumes is outstanding. It doesn't look too slick or digitally retouched.

    6. The MAD issues in this collection still hold up after 60+ years. Even though the style and targets in these issues is a lot different than those that appear in today's MAD, you can see the genesis of the modern MAD.

    7. The exaggerated art is the only thing remotely funny about this. Dumb parodies, corny jokes, and feels really dated.

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