- By Ray Bradbury

Dandelion Wine

  • Title: Dandelion Wine
  • Author: Ray Bradbury
  • ISBN: 9780380977260
  • Page: 487
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Dandelion Wine Ray Bradbury s moving recollection of a vanished golden era remains one of his most enchanting novels Dandelion Wine stands out in the Bradbury literary canon as the author s most deeply personal work

    Ray Bradbury s moving recollection of a vanished golden era remains one of his most enchanting novels Dandelion Wine stands out in the Bradbury literary canon as the author s most deeply personal work, a semi autobiographical recollection of a magical small town summer in 1928.Twelve year old Douglas Spaulding knows Green Town, Illinois, is as vast and deep as the whole wRay Bradbury s moving recollection of a vanished golden era remains one of his most enchanting novels Dandelion Wine stands out in the Bradbury literary canon as the author s most deeply personal work, a semi autobiographical recollection of a magical small town summer in 1928.Twelve year old Douglas Spaulding knows Green Town, Illinois, is as vast and deep as the whole wide world that lies beyond the city limits It is a pair of brand new tennis shoes, the first harvest of dandelions for Grandfather s renowned intoxicant, the distant clang of the trolley s bell on a hazy afternoon It is yesteryear and tomorrow blended into an unforgettable always But as young Douglas is about to discover, summer can be than the repetition of established rituals whose mystical power holds time at bay It can be a best friend moving away, a human time machine who can transport you back to the Civil War, or a sideshow automaton able to glimpse the bittersweet future.Come and savor Ray Bradbury s priceless distillation of all that is eternal about boyhood and summer.

    1 thought on “Dandelion Wine

    1. The only reason I gave this book five stars was because I couldn't give it five thousand.I can't express how beautiful this book is. I've never cried so hard (no, not even when Mrs. Johnson read us "Where the Red Fern Grows" in the third grade), nor have I felt so much love from a bunch of grouped together, sixty-year-old, courier-fonted words. I've never been more scared than I was by the possibility of the Lonely One being just around the corner, hiding in the shadows. I've never thought so mu [...]

    2. Magic Realism - according to "Magical realism, magic realism, or marvelous realism is a genre of narrative fiction and, more broadly, art (literature, painting, film, theatre, etc.) that, while encompassing a range of subtly different concepts, expresses a primarily realistic view of the real world while also adding or revealing magical elements. It is sometimes called fabulism, in reference to the conventions of fables, myths, and allegory. "Magical realism", perhaps the most common term, often [...]

    3. “Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them.”I re-read this after a couple of decades and like most works, I appreciate it better now than then. “A good night sleep, or a ten minute bawl, or a pint of chocolate ice cream, or all three together, is good medicine.” It could [...]

    4. Recently while moving bookcases, books and furniture around, I came across my copy of Dandelion Wine. I had read it once, years ago, during my own personal Golden Age of Science Fiction, ages 8 to 16. Now was a good time as any to revisit this novel. Bradbury had been marked, incorrectly, in my mind as a sci-fi writer on the same level as Heinlein or Asimov.He's not a hard core, I, Robot type of sci-fi writer, really. More like a fantasy writer who touched on sci-fi themes.And, he's in his own l [...]

    5. "I want to feel all there is to feel, he thought. Let me feel tired, now, let me feel tired. I mustn't forget, I'm alive, I know I'm alive, I mustn't forget it tonight or tomorrow or the day after that."-Ray Bradbury, Dandelion WineIngredients1 quart yellow dandelion blossoms, well rinsed 1 gallon boiling water 1 (.25 ounce) package active dry yeast 1 orange, sliced 1 lemon sliceDirectionsPlace dandelion blossoms in the boiling water, and allow to stand for 4 minutes. Remove and discard the blos [...]

    6. ¡apparently my 1,000th rating! I should be stoked at the milestone I guess, but I was really digging how that 999 looked under my avatar. maybe I should go back and un-rate something and then just keep doing that as needed.

    7. Sure, it's overly sentimental and largely ignores the social problems of the time depicted, but when you're 12 years old in small-town America, there are no social problems. There are only problems regarding the new pair of tennis shoes you want, the creepy guy who hangs out in the ravine, the desire to live forever, to be young forever, to build the perfect happiness machine. Besides, Bradbury's writing is so rich it practically drips, much like biting into a perfectly ripe peach in August.

    8. Um.ok so I totally hated this book. I hope someone out there can tell me why this is a good book. It's unique, sure, but it's just a mess of words. In reading the introduction, I felt like I got a sense of why that is. The author said he forced himself to word-dump every single morning - just writing as creatively etc as he could. Well, I think he just put those "creative" word-dumps together and called it a story. It has no story line, no voice, no character development, no point. The author ju [...]

    9. "Dandelion Wine. The words were summer on the tongue".We all love to travel, one way or another. That's why we read! To experience time; To experience new worlds; To experienceAnd sometimes, we find those peculiar time machines that take us to somewhere special. Let's say, a reminiscent of nostalgic childhood. That one is always special. My favorite in that category are To Kill a Mockingbird and Malgudi DaysNow I have Dandelion Wine And It is different from all these books!In Dandelion Wine, Ray [...]

    10. Let’s get one thing clear Dandelion Wine is not science fiction, it is not exactly fantasy either, though there is some element of magic realism to it. So if you are a fan of Ray Bradbury’s sci-fi books like Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles, or his fantasy Something Wicked This Way Comes, and you are looking for more in that fantastical vein, Dandelion Wine may disappoint you. The best mental preparation is to forget about genre and just let Bradbury tell his story in that uniquely [...]

    11. Is it possible to catch magic in a bottle? Sunshine or the stars in the sky like captured fireflies? Maybe not, but Bradbury certainly captured a boys summer in a bottle and it was sweet as Dandelion Wine. There is something about Bradbury's style that makes me reminisce about my boyhood like no other writer has. Similar to what he did with Something Wicked this way Comes and The Halloween Tree, Bradbury pulls me into his story with his poetic, symbolically descriptive style in a way that does w [...]

    12. If a day ever comes when the patisseries of the world draw back their prized pastries and sweets, and replace them with old and new copies of Dandelion Wine, I would be the first one, surely, to grab hold of the person next to me and aver in my most jubilant voice that Yes, I did see it coming. Nobody else but me in the whole wide world.Twelve-year-old Douglas Spaulding snaps his finger before a slowly waking Green Town, and thus begins the summer of 1928. A summer of surprises, of mysteries, of [...]

    13. it was the summer of 1928, way before Radio or TV were part of our life. 12 year old Douglas spent that summer exploring his small town and its people. He started jotting down his "discoveries and revelations" in a notepad so that he won't forget about them. We through him met extraordinary people of this small town. A man adamant on making a Happiness Machine, an old woman who thought that she had met her lover from her past life, going away of a dear friend, last ride on the trolley, and magic [...]

    14. Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader.Some people turn sad awfully young. No special reason, it seems, but they seem almost to be born that way. They bruise easier, tire faster, cry quicker, remember longer and, as I say, get sadder younger than anyone else in the world. I know, for I'm one of them.In a serendipitous moment, I discovered this quote on my friend Sookie’s favorited quotes page and instantly began craving the book. I was left pondering over these words for days and weeks [...]

    15. I enjoyed reading this book when I was in my early 20s, but only re-reading it in my 50s have I realized what a wonderful novel "Dandelion Wine" is, what an amazing evocation of summer in a small town. The summer evoked is 1928, but it could almost as easily be 1948 or 1968 as well. The book paints a picture of a time when one walked or took a trolley around town, talked with friends and family on a large front porch, had a soda or ice cream at a drugstore fountain, and listened to grandfathers [...]

    16. "Dandelion wine. The words were summer on the tongue. The wine was summer caught and stoppered."“I want to feel all there is to feel, he thought. Let me feel tired, now, let me feel tired. I mustn't forget, I'm alive, I know I'm alive, I mustn't forget it tonight or tomorrow or the day after that.”Doug (12) and Tom (10) Spaulding live in Green Town, Illinois. Bradbury published this book in 1957, though you can see why this became popular in the late sixties, celebrating summer and nature as [...]

    17. This is my favorite novel. I haven't written a review for it yet because I feel too much pressure to capture in words how I feel about this magical book. So for now let's just say I'll expand this short review at a later date. If I don't say that now, I might never write the review. So why is this my favorite book? Here are just a few reasons:1. It captures the complex and wonderful relationship a child can have with his grandparents. My own grandma and grandpa helped raise me and are still two [...]

    18. Literary works don’t focus on plot, but on experiences and learning from a character’s life. Bradbury has given the world a fine masterpiece of literature in “Dandelion Wine.” The story follows the life of a boy, Douglas Spaulding, and his friends and family, in summer of 1928. If we think back on our summers as children, can we find one plot branching into subplots, or do we find a mass of short stories involving characters we learned from? We experienced life, stretched the limits of s [...]

    19. I doubt if there has been a better book written about summer and boyhood than DANDELION WINE. Dan Simmon's Summer of Night of course comes to mind. But where Simmons gives us the delicious darkness, Bradbury's tale is a bit more full of light and magic. It's all about Green Town, Illinois in the early 20th century. There are no TV's, computers, or cell phones. Just small town citizens interacting as human beings should. It was a time of cigar stores and front porches and soda fountains. Young Do [...]

    20. While no one can top Stephen King (for me), Ray Bradbury is certainly my second favorite author. His writing is so precise — he says neither too much nor too little — with nary a word out of place. He evokes emotions buried deep within me, every damn time. Dandelion Wine is magical realism mixed with coming of age; this story oozes charm and is filled with quotable passages. While the main character is Douglas, a twelve year old boy who is realizing what it means to be 'alive', the narrative [...]

    21. Ray Bradbury's classic about Douglas Spaulding growing up in 1928 small town America , where every year his Grandfather makes his famous Dandelion Wine, capturing the taste of Summer in every bottle. Loosely based on his own life. The audio version was like listening to an old time radio show. YA, fun 4 stars.

    22. Note, Jan 1, 2015: I've just updated this to correct a minor typo --a misspelling of the author's name in one place.Bradbury is best remembered as a writer in the speculative genres, especially science fiction; but that wasn't all he wrote. This gem of American general fiction has no Martians or space ships, no vampires or ghosts; it's just the story of a typical summer in the life of a 12-year-old boy, growing up in a small town in Illinois in the 1920s. Bradbury (b. 1920) grew up in Waukegan, [...]

    23. +Reto Popsugar 2016: #25: Que transcurre en el verano+nostalgic. candid. melancolic. a summer through children eyes. discoveries and goodbyes catch 'that' special instant inside a botle of dandelion wine, the wine for every day of summer. maybe an almost love plenty of voyages and descoveries and 'if'.family. places in the heart. food and wonder. and some touch of darkness to enjoy life. magic.Sí, el verano era ritos, celebrados en el momento y el sitio indicados. El rito de la limonada y el t [...]

    24. The monitor of my group in university advised me to read this book and noted that this book is for those people who dream a lot. I'm that kind of person, that's why I took the idea willingly and started reading. First of all, I'd like to mention that it warmed my heart during cold autumn evenings and gave the atmosphere of coziness and love. And this is what I've been waiting for from a book with such a romantic title.Ray Bradbury gave us the wonderful possibility to make an unforgettable nostal [...]

    25. I first read this during my teenaged Bradbury binge and loved it. It spoke to me personally in a way that, say, The Martian Chronicles, did not. Doug Spaulding may as well have been me.The second time I read it, in my twenties, all I really remembered was two out of three early episodes (the tennis shoes and the forest picnic) from right at the beginning of the book. Hence I was expecting a childhood nostalgia fest and got a bit of a shock. The book has a dark current running through it.This tim [...]

    26. If you get caught up in Ray Bradbury's usual eerie subject matter, it's easy to forget that he's a master prose stylist and one of the greatest writers of our time. For my money, Dandelion Wine is by far his most beautiful work. It's hard to peg: I guess you could call it a coming-of-age story, but that's much too simplistic for this timeless, complex, and layered book - it transcends the genre. The series of kaleidoscopic, ever-shifting vignettes of one summer in a small Midwestern town - told [...]

    27. Yaşıyorum lan. Hayatta olmak çok güzel. O kadar fazla duygu var ki deneyimlenecek yeterli vaktim olmama ihtimali korkutuyor.Aynen bu şekilde çığlık atan bir kitap okudum. Okunmalı hatta eşe dosta okutmalı.

    28. “And there, row upon row, with the soft gleam of flowers opened at morning, with the light of this June sun glowing through a faint skin of dust, would stand the dandelion wine. Peer through it at the wintry day – the snow melted to grass, the trees were reinhabitated with bird, leaf, and blossoms like a continent of butterflies breathing on the wind. And peering through, color sky from iron to blue. Hold summer in your hand, pour summer in a glass, a tiny glass of course, the smallest tingl [...]

    29. I am not a summer person, but this book makes me wish I was. The lazy days of summer, of enjoying the heat instead of feeling oppressed by it. Running all over town with my friends, disbelieving that the adults around me ever did the same. Bottling dandelion wine against the winter, when each day of summer will be drunk and remembered anew.Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here.In the meantime, [...]

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