- By Peter Lovesey

The Detective Wore Silk Drawers

  • Title: The Detective Wore Silk Drawers
  • Author: Peter Lovesey
  • ISBN: 9780140055580
  • Page: 231
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Detective Wore Silk Drawers This entertaining period mystery set in Victorian England is lively lurid amusing Publishers Weekly These are humorous novels and the humour is character based mixed with the absurdities of the En

    This entertaining period mystery, set in Victorian England, is lively, lurid, amusing Publishers Weekly These are humorous novels and the humour is character based mixed with the absurdities of the English class system Cribb was the first of the new wave Victorian crime fighters and is arguably still the best Sherlock Holmes Magazine The second Sergeant This entertaining period mystery, set in Victorian England, is lively, lurid, amusing Publishers Weekly These are humorous novels and the humour is character based mixed with the absurdities of the English class system Cribb was the first of the new wave Victorian crime fighters and is arguably still the best Sherlock Holmes Magazine The second Sergeant Cribb mystery is set in the world of Victorian bare fisted pugilism an illegal sport Constable Jago is sent, undercover, to Radstock Hall by Sergeant Cribb, who suspects that when fighters who train there lose, they are murdered.

    1 thought on “The Detective Wore Silk Drawers

    1. First finished. Book of 2016. I used to enjoy Sgt Cribb on TV in the late seventies, also Peter Lovesey went to school with an aunt of my husbands, so thought I'd give it a try. I enjoyed it very much but felt the ending was a little woolly. A bare knuckle fighter is washed up on the embankment headless, and Sergeant Cribb sends a young constable undercover to gather information. Poor chap, Henry Jago, is recruited, a champion boxer though not in the banned bare knuckle sport he is able to survi [...]

    2. [This review originally appeared in Historical Novel Review:] The second of Peter Lovesey’s Victorian mysteries (now reissued) plunges Sergeant Cribb and Constable Thackery into the underworld of bare-knuckled pugilism. In 1880, fighting with “the raw ‘uns” has been outlawed in England for a decade, yet matches in out-of-the-way locales still draw huge crowds. When the headless body of a man with scarred knuckles washes up on the Thames Embankment, Cribb recruits a young policeman, Henry [...]

    3. This was bizarre. I can't say I'm keen on sporting stories, especially ones about bare-knuckle fighting, and I was constantly worried about poor PC Jago. Sgt. Cribb takes Jowett's admiration of the French method seriously and sends a new, relatively unknown constable under cover as a bare-knuckle boxer. Jago is at least familiar with boxing and athletic, but he's a privately educated, university man who for some reason decided to be a copper. He has a colonel's daughter for a girlfriend. He has [...]

    4. This book is the second in the Sergeant Cribbs Investigation series set in Victorian England. Bare fisted fighting has been illegal for twenty years, but when a headless body surfaces in the Thames well-muscled, Cribbs remembers another headless one last January and one more last year. He surmises that there is a ring of pugilists who ignore the law regarding bare-fisted fighting. He selects a young, well muscled policeman to infiltrate Radstock Hall where boxers are being trained. Strapping Con [...]

    5. A headless man is washed up from the Thames, and from his condition is determined to be a bare fisted prize fighter or pugilist. Sargent Cribb, Detective Constable Thackery and Constable Jago set out to find the killer. Jago goes(who has boxing experience) undercover to find the instigators responsible for "pugilism" (which is illegal in England) and possibly murder.The book is a mystery and also very funny. It is difficult and very funny to imagine in modern times to read about the dos and don' [...]

    6. Set in Victorian England, bare fisted fighting is illegal yet fights still occur. when a body is found clearly connected to the illegal sport, Sergeant Cribb sends constable Jago undercover to investigate and find the identity of the dead body and the killer. The book is filled with fights and a side of England I for one was totally unfamiliar with. I felt sorry for Jago at many turns but was very satisfied with the end result.

    7. Bare-fisted pugilism was apparently illegal in Victorian England, so what better setting than the circle of law-breakers who prepared the fighters and ran the fights? Except the execution left much to be desired. This one rather turned me off reading the rest of the Sergeant Crabb books. Giving them a break for a while before I dig in again.

    8. The unique setting of this enjoyable, light-hearted Victorian-era mystery and the descriptions of life in and around London in 1880 more than make up for the fact that the actual mystery is rather blah and predictable.

    9. After the promising first book in the Sgt Cribb series, this second book in the series was a real disappointment. Felt as if it were thrown together in an afternoon. Sketchily drawn characters, stilted, flat dialogue. It seemed like an afterthought of a book.

    10. Peter Lovesey continues an excellent series of Victorian detective mysteries (written in the 1970s). He is an extremely witty writer, and the twists of his plots are not predictable.

    11. I enjoy the novels with Sergeant Cribb and Detective Constable Thackeray. They're fast paced and very interesting.

    12. Not as good as it might be. Didn't seem to come together for me but I wasn't really into the story and kept putting it down. Love Lovesy but not one of his better books.

    13. Terrific stuff - witty, strong characterisation, lovely setting, excellent vocabulary. Piccadilly Weepers, anyone? Shouldn't be out of print in my opinion!

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